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    #1

    may / might

    1. He may have been busy.
    2. He might have been busy.

    Is #1 correct? It appears wrong to me because 'may' refers to the present whereas 'might' refers to the past.

    Thanks in advance.


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    #2

    Re: may / might

    Similarly, we can use the modal auxiliaries may or might to say that there is a chance that something is true or may happen. May and might are used to talk about present or future events. They can normally be used interchangeably, although might may suggest a smaller chance of something happening.


    For instance:

    Q: What are you doing over the hollidays?
    A: I may go to America, but there again, I might stay at home.

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    #3

    Re: may / might

    I think what you've written is not a reply to my question.


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    #4

    Re: may / might

    MAY cannot refer to the present when you have written ''have been busy''?
    Once again, the only difference is that might may suggest a smaller chance of something happening/happened.

    I thougt you will figure that out on your own... Sorry!
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    #5

    Re: may / might

    It refers to posibility of something that happened...

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    #6

    Re: may / might

    'Might' is also the past form of the word 'may'. Am I not correct?

    He might have stolen my watch. This sentence indicates that it had happened perhaps some time ago.

    Of course, it may also suggest less possibility than 'may'.

    He may have stolen my watch. This is used in relation to the present. I suspect that he has stolen my watch.

    Correct me if I'm wrong.


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    #7

    Re: may / might

    Aham...
    “Might” is also the past tense of the auxiliary verb “may,” and is required in sentences like “Chuck might have avoided arrest for the robbery if he hadn’t given the teller his business card before asking for the money.”
    When speculating that events might have been other than they were, don’t substitute “may” for “might."

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