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Thread: adding ed

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #91
    1. I don't mind getting brand name clothes. :D
    2. I don't mind getting brand named clothes. :(
    3. I don't mind getting brand name clothe. :D
    4. I don't mind getting brand named clothe. :(

    In addition, brand name or brand-name is a compound adjective, meaning name of a brand. Click here.

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #92
    Thanks.

    Is this correct?

    1. How do I know if -ed need to be added or not? (Is the subject 'I'? What is the verb?)
    2. How do I know if -ed needs to be added or not?

    3. How do I know if I need -ed added or not? (What is the subject and verb for this one?)

    Does the article 'a' modify 'damage'? I know sometimes it does and sometimes it doesn't. How do I know this? Could you give me some examples please?

    Are these correct?
    4. This is a damage car. (Is this incorrect?)
    5. This is a damaged car.

    6. In addition, brand name or brand-name is a compound adjective, meaning name of a brand.
    7. In addition, brand name or brand-name is a compounded adjective, meaning name of a brand.

    Do these make sense?
    8. He learns how to drive the car today. (What does this mean?)
    9. He learned how to drive the car today. (What does this mean?)

    10. This is a double sided cd.
    11. This is a double side cd. (Is this incorrect? b/c 'What kind of cd is this? This cd is double sided.')

    Are these correct?
    12. This is a double-side cd.
    13. This is a double-sided cd.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #93
    1. How do I know if -ed need to be added or not? :(
    2. How do I know if -ed needs to be added or not? :D
    Note that, if you can replace -ed with 'it', then it's singular, so it takes a singular verb:

    -ed need to be replaced. :(
    It needs to be replaced. :D
    -ed needs to be replaced. :D :D

    Main clause
    "I" is the subject and "know" is the verb

    Dependent clause
    "-ed" is the subject (i.e., it) and "needs" is the verb

    3. How do I know if I need -ed added or not?
    Dependent clause
    "I" is the subject and "need" is the verb. "-ed" functions as the verb's object:

    I need -ed (to be) added (by someone) or not. (Passive structure)

    Does the article 'a' modify 'damage'? I know sometimes it does and sometimes it doesn't. How do I know this? Could you give me some examples please?

    Are these correct?
    4. This is a damage car. :(
    5. This is a damaged car. :D
    The article/determiner "a" modifies the noun "car", not the adjective "damaged". The adjective just happens to occur between the two. :wink: "a" never modifies adjectives.

    6. In addition, brand name or brand-name is a compound adjective, meaning name of a brand.
    7. In addition, brand name or brand-name is a compounded adjective, meaning name of a brand.
    I'm not sure I understand what you're asking so please forgive me if I'm giving you the wrong reply. The word brand name has two spellings: 1) Without a hyphen (brand name) and 2) with a hyphen (brand-name). The hyphen tells us that 'brand' and 'name' go together as a set pair. :wink:

    Do these make sense?
    8. He learns how to drive the car today. :D
    9. He learned how to drive the car today. :D
    8. is another way of saying, "He is going to learn how to drive today" (Future). 9. refers to the past (i.e., the time before now, say, this morning).

    10. This is a double sided cd. :D
    11a. This is a double side cd. :(
    11b. This cd is double sided. :D
    12. This is a double-side cd. :(
    13. This is a double-sided cd. :D
    With or without the hyphen is OK, but the hyphen helps.

    Note, "cd" should be capitalized. It's an acronym: Compact Disc (CD)

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #94
    Thanks.

    Back to this one again:
    1. In addition, brand name or brand-name is a compound adjective, meaning name of a brand.
    2. In addition, brand name or brand-name is a compounded adjective, meaning name of a brand.

    I'm trying to ask if 'compound' is correct or 'compounded' is correct?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #95
    1. a compound adjective :D
    2. a compounded adjective :(


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #96
    a compounded adjective
    1. This is a compounded adjective.
    2. This is a damanged car.

    Isn't #1 a to-be sentence? Why is #2 correct and #1 is wrong?

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    3. This gives the best viewing area for multiple open applications.
    4. This gives the best viewing area for multiple opened applications.
    5. You can have more windows open.
    6. You can have more windows opened.

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    7. I got disinterested of thinking I hate her.
    8. I got disinterested of thinking I hated her.

    Are these correct? Do I need 'of' or 'about' there?
    9. I got disinterested of thinking of I hated her.
    10. I got disinterested of thinking about I hated her.

    11. I get disinterested of thinking I hated her.
    12. I get disinterested of thinking I hate her.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #97
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    1. This is a compounded adjective.
    2. This is a damanged car.

    Isn't #1 a to-be sentence? Why is #2 correct and #1 is wrong?
    Both are linking structures, yes. Whether or not -ed can be added to a given word has to do with the word's category. 'compound' is a noun, and nouns being of the category Nominal can function as is as adjectives. That is, -ed need not be added. Nominals include: nouns, adjectives and prepositions. The word 'damage' is a not a nominal; it's a verb and so either -ed or -ing must be added to make it an adjective. When a verb is made into an adjective, the resulting form is called a participle: damaged car, damaging report.

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #98
    3. open applications. :D
    4. opened applications. :(
    5. You can have more windows open. :D
    => Windows are open.
    6. You can have more windows opened for you. :D
    => Windows are being opened for you; Someone will open them for you.

    Use the adjective 'open' with a noun e.g. an open door; Use the participle 'opened' as a helping verb e.g. The door was opened (Passive). Note that, 'opened' is also a verb, a past tense verb e.g., She opened the door.

    7. I got disinterested of thinking I hate her.
    8. I got disinterested of thinking I hated her.
    9. I got disinterested of thinking of I hated her.
    10. I got disinterested of thinking about I hated her.
    11. I get disinterested of thinking I hated her.
    12. I get disinterested of thinking I hate her.
    Sorry. I can't understand the sentences above. :(


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #99
    I hope these make sense now:

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. I got bored of thinking I hate her.
    2. I got bored of thinking I hated her.

    Are these correct? Do I need 'of' or 'about' there?
    3. I got bored of thinking of I hated her.
    4. I got bored of thinking about I hated her.

    5. I get bored of thinking I hated her.
    6. I get bored of thinking I hate her.

    Is this correct?
    7. Jack, call you? (This is correct? Is it b/c of this 'Did Jack call you?" I changed it and shorten it out and made it to 'Jack, call you?")

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #100
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    I hope these make sense now:

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. I got bored of thinking I hate her.
    2. I got bored of thinking I hated her.

    Are these correct? Do I need 'of' or 'about' there?
    3. I got bored of thinking of I hated her.
    4. I got bored of thinking about I hated her.

    5. I get bored of thinking I hated her.
    6. I get bored of thinking I hate her.
    Sorry. I still can't understand them. :? It's the 'of thinking' that has me confused.

    7. Jack, call you? (This is correct? Is it b/c of this 'Did Jack call you?" I changed it and shorten it out and made it to 'Jack, call you?")
    The comma is not required becuase nothing has been omitted between Jack and call you: Jack call you? (OK)

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