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Thread: would or will


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #61
    Code:
    I don't think that you'd want to pay for it, (if....) Conditional
    Is it wrong without the conditional part? If so, why? Why does the other one work without the conditional part?


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #62
    I don't think that you'd want to pay for it, (if....) Conditional
    'Would' is used when you are talking about imaginary or hypothetical things. Here in this sentence, I believe that you won't pay for it(in true). But, I am setting up an imaginary situation that you wouldn't pay for it, which is a bit contradictary to my belief.
    It's the if(conditional)-concept that being used in the sentence rather than its structure, "If..., I would..... ." Do you understand? :D


    I don't think that you will want to pay for it. (Future)
    This one is not refering to any imaginary situation. It's a neutral fact that you will not pay for it. That's all.


    If I use the former sentence, I'm not very confident if you would pay for it or not. That is to say, there're two possibilities, you would or you would not. If I use the latter sentence, I think you will not pay. There's only one possibility I have in my mind. But who knows if you change your mind and you will pay for it.


    :) :D

  1. Steven D's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2004
    • Posts: 834
    #63
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I don't think that you'd want to pay for it, (if....) Conditional
    'Would' is used when you are talking about imaginary or hypothetical things. Here in this sentence, I believe that you won't pay for it(in true). But, I am setting up an imaginary situation that you wouldn't pay for it, which is a bit contradictary to my belief.
    It's the if(conditional)-concept that being used in the sentence rather than its structure, "If..., I would..... ." Do you understand? :D


    I don't think that you will want to pay for it. (Future)
    This one is not refering to any imaginary situation. It's a neutral fact that you will not pay for it. That's all.


    If I use the former sentence, I'm not very confident if you would pay for it or not. That is to say, there're two possibilities, you would or you would not. If I use the latter sentence, I think you will not pay. There's only one possibility I have in my mind. But who knows if you change your mind and you will pay for it.


    :) :D
    Hi there,

    That makes sense to me. I'll just see if I can put it into my own words. They might turn out to be similar to yours. :)

    I don't think that you'd want to pay for it, (if....) Conditional


    If the speaker uses "would", then he/she sees the possibility as being more distant. To the speaker, it is less of a possibility.

    If the speaker uses "will", then he/she sees the possibility as being closer to reality. It is more of a possibility to the speaker.


    I don't think you'd want to pay for it if it were over $500.00.

    The listener might already have considered paying for it. The speaker is more cautious. There is not a good chance that it is going to be over $500.00 in the first place - I don't think.

    I don't think you'll want to pay for it if it is over $500.00.

    There's more of a chance here that it could be over $500.00 in the speaker's mind for some reason. We would need more context to know what the speaker is thinking about when he/she chooses to use either the first conditional or the second conditional - would as opposed to will.

    I might have more to say on this later. I might have one or two other examples. I have one with some context surrounding it.


    I'll have to dig it up later.


    :D 8)


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #64
    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    That makes sense to me. I'll just see if I can put it into my own words. They might turn out to be similar to yours. :)
    Thank you, X Mode.







    I love your explanation which make people dig. If there is enough oxegon and popcorn under the ground, digging can be fun!


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #65
    Thanks.

    Are these correct? If not, why?
    1. If I did not connect it correcly, there would be no sound. (Imaginary?)
    2. If I did not connect it correcly, there will be no sound. (What does this mean?)

    Are these correct?
    3. If I did not connect it correcly, there will be no sound right now.
    4. If I did not connect it correcly, there would be no sound right now.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #66
    1 is correct if talking about an imaginary situation and 2 would be better if you said 'haven't connected it correctly'. I don't see the need for 'right now' in 3&4- there's no need for emphasis.

  3. Steven D's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2004
    • Posts: 834
    #67
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    That makes sense to me. I'll just see if I can put it into my own words. They might turn out to be similar to yours. :)
    Thank you, X Mode.







    I love your explanation which make people dig. If there is enough oxegon and popcorn under the ground, digging can be fun!

    Thanks you, and you're welcome.

    :D 8) :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #68
    Are these correct? How come I can't use 'had'? Is it b/c of 'would', I have to use the base word? How can I say something with past participle then?

    1. It wouldnít have exploded.
    2. It wouldnít had exploded.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #69
    What do these mean? Does it matter if I use present, present or past, past or present, past or present, or present past?

    1. If Iím getting some proper sleep, I would be more awake right now.
    2. If Iím getting some proper sleep right now, I will be more awake right now.
    3. If I was getting some proper sleep, I would be more awake right now.
    4. If I was getting some proper sleep, I will be more awake right now.

    What do these mean?
    5. I would like to thank you.
    6. I will like to thank you .


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #70
    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    Thanks you, and you're welcome.

    :D 8) :D

    There's a verbal comma right behind thanks, isn't it?! 8)

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