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    • Join Date: May 2007
    • Posts: 5
    #1

    Smile like and as

    hello everyone,this is the first time i post my thread in this forum,if my thread have too much,please help me check it.
    how do we use 'like' and 'as'?sometimes i feel that 'like' and 'if' almost alike each other,but in some circumsatances,there is some difference between them
    i have done some test about 'like' and 'if',i have got a result,not bad:17/19,but i want to know this problem clearly
    please reply to me soon
    thank you

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: like and as

    Welcome, lion alio.

    Use like before a noun and use as if before a subject + verb set:

    You drive like your father. <noun>
    You drive as if you are your father. <subject+verb>

    You may also want to take a look here: &#167; 33. like. 1. Grammar. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996

    Does that help?

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #3

    Re: like and as

    Suggested Corrections
    Hello, everyone.

    This is my first time posting a thread in this forum, so if there are any mistakes, please correct them.

    How do we use 'like' and 'as if'? Sometimes I feel they are almost alike, and other times I feel they are different. I had a test on 'like' and 'as if' and got 17 out of 19, which isn't a bad result at all, but I am still not 100% sure about the difference between them.

    Please reply soon.

    Thank you

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