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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #1

    "call China" or "call to china"?

    Which of these two forms is more correct to mean "call somebody who lives in China"?

    P.s: Little doubt: is the word "mean" correctly used in the sentence above?

    Thank you in advance


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    You can either "make a call to China" or "call .... in China".

    Yes - "mean" is fine.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #3

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    You can either "make a call to China" or "call .... in China".

    Yes - "mean" is fine.
    thank you anglika...

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #4

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    You can either "make a call to China" or "call .... in China".

    Yes - "mean" is fine.
    And, speaking about calls in general, you can also say "calling China": 'I spent a fortune calling China while John was posted in Beijing.' Here you would say 'calling China', because 'calling John in China' would be just as expensive as 'calling A. N. Other in China', so there's no need to specify the person you're ringing.

    b


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #5

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    So:
    -to make a call to China
    -to call sb in China
    -to call China
    are all correct.
    What about "to call to China", using the verb in its intransitive meaning?

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #6

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    What about "to call to China", using the verb in its intransitive meaning?
    As in, I want to call to China? It's said, yes, but it's not standard, nor is it colloquial. It's idiomatic and short for I want to (make a) call to China.

    Does that help?


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #7

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    As in, I want to call to China? It's said, yes, but it's not standard, nor is it colloquial. It's idiomatic and short for I want to (make a) call to China.

    Does that help?
    Yes, your explanation is clear. Thank you...
    I have another question about this. If it's not standard nor colloquial, in which kind of situation might I hear this idiom? If I understand, not certainly in a formal conversation....

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #8

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    Ex: I want to call to China.

    One possible situation comes to mind. If the speaker shortens to make a call to someone/somewhere to to call to someone/somewhere. The result to call to China (notably the preposition to) is awkward. To works with the verb to make, not with the verb to call:

    To make a call to someone/somewhere
    To call someone/somewhere

    The usual way of expressing those verbs is as follows:

    Ex: I want to make a call to someone in China.
    Ex: I want to make a call to China.

    Ex: I want to call someone in China.
    Ex: I want to call China.

    Does that help?


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #9

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    I think you misunderstood what I meant. I apologize for my english; however I'll try to explain it better.
    In my language there is a big difference between formal and informal conversation. There are some phrases you can use in informal conversation but you should NOT use in formal conversation.
    Is the expression to call to someone/somewhere (shortening to make a call to someone/somewhere to the previous sentence) formal or informal? I suppose informal, am I right?

    An other little question. If the speaker shortens to make a call to China to to call China, the word call in the second sentence remains a noun, doesn't it?
    So, how would it be for the third person?

    Thank you for your help.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #10

    Re: "call China" or "call to china"?

    Formality doesn't come into play here, but I see what you're after:

    Standard: to make a call to someone/somewhere <What you would call 'formal'>
    Non-standard: to call to someone/somewhere <What you would call 'informal'>

    To call to means to get someone's attention; e.g., I'm calling to Max (she's ahead of me, at the end of the trail) but she doesn't hear me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage
    An other little question. If the speaker shortens to make a call to China to to call China, the word call in the second sentence remains a noun, doesn't it? So, how would it be for the third person?
    The noun call becomes a verb. Like this,

    to make (verb) a call (noun) to (preposition) China (noun)
    to call (verb) China (noun)

    Does that help?

    _____________________
    Correction
    another, not an other.

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