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    #1

    pls helpppp

    Hello there,

    I know I asked many questions, but please, please help...

    1) The train’s first-class cars lumbered forward with irresponsible leisure, but now that journey, like everything that had come before, seemed part of an unrecognizable oblivion.

    Does it sound like the train slowly moved and didn't care how fast the passenger want to go?

    "everything" = every trips (by train)? or something that happened before she took the train?

    and what does "a part of unrecognizable oblivion" here mean?

    2) The olive-brown feather protruding from her hat nodded with dignified resistance.

    What is dignified resistance? Does it mean the lady wearing the feather hat nodded though she did not belief (resist) what she heard??

    3) A woman lost her husband and her servant looked at her longingly.

    Does "longingly" here imply that the servant would like to calm that woman down or console her?

    4) There was no reason to hurry, not with what must be brewing already over this at the Central Station between the frantic city aldermen and Mayor Lincoln, who already had him by the ears for not raiding enough gambling “hells” and prostitution houses.

    what does the red sentence mean? and what does "have him by the ears" mean? have a quarrel with him?

    5) A terrible scream cleaved the air before he had walked very far. It belched forth in light echoes from the house’s dozen chimneys.

    "Dozen" here is 12? Is it possible that a house contains 12 chimneys or does it imply something else? pls help.

    6) "The murder of Healey had finished him already" What does it mean? Healey is now dead? him = healey?

    Well, if you want to read the full context, pls visit THE DANTE CLUB Excerpts It's good story but quite difficult for me to understand it clearly and I need your help...

    Tks,


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: pls helpppp

    Quote Originally Posted by beeja View Post
    Hello there,

    I know I asked many questions, but please, please help...

    1) The train’s first-class cars lumbered forward with irresponsible leisure, but now that journey, like everything that had come before, seemed part of an unrecognizable oblivion.

    Does it sound like the train slowly moved and didn't care how fast the passenger want to go?

    "everything" = every trips (by train)? or something that happened before she took the train? All the events that had preceded her journey.

    and what does "a part of unrecognizable oblivion" here mean? "She" doesn't want to believe what was in the telegram and is trying to dismiss it.

    2) The olive-brown feather protruding from her hat nodded with dignified resistance.

    What is dignified resistance? Does it mean the lady wearing the feather hat nodded though she did not believe (resist) what she heard?? The feather was stiff - like a pheasant's tail-feather, not an ostrich tail-feather.

    3) A woman lost her husband and her servant looked at her longingly.

    Does "longingly" here imply that the servant would like to calm that woman down or console her? Probably. I can't find the exact reference.

    4) There was no reason to hurry, not with what must be brewing already over this at the Central Station between the frantic city aldermen and Mayor Lincoln, who already had him by the ears for not raiding enough gambling “hells” and prostitution houses.

    what does the red sentence mean? and what does "have him by the ears" mean? have a quarrel with him? The aldermen and the Mayor are disagreeing about the way in which the city is policed, and the Mayor is making sure that Kurtz knows he is angry.

    5) A terrible scream cleaved the air before he had walked very far. It belched forth in light echoes from the house’s dozen chimneys.

    "Dozen" here is 12? Is it possible that a house contains 12 chimneys or does it imply something else? pls help. If a house had at least twelve rooms, each with a fireplace, then yes, it can have 12 chimneys.

    6) "The murder of Healey had finished him already" What does it mean? Healey is now dead? him = healey? It means that Healey's unsolved murder is about to end Kurtz's career as a policeman.

    Well, if you want to read the full context, please visit THE DANTE CLUB Excerpts It's good story but quite difficult for me to understand it clearly and I need your help...

    Thanks,

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    #3

    Re: pls helpppp

    Ednah Healey wept slowly at first, as a woman might for a dead household pet—reflective and governed but without anger. The olive-brown feather protruding from her hat nodded with dignified resistance.

    Nell looked at Mrs. Healey longingly, then said with great humanity, “You ought to come back later in the day, Chief Kurtz, if you please.”

    Does "longingly" here imply that the servant would like to calm that woman down or console her?

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    "You and your deputies are to keep this completely confidential, by the order of the mayor."

    "Oh, very like." He laughed quickly, irresponsibly, like a child. "Well, old Healey would have been an awfully fat man to haul about. At least we can trust it was not the grieving widder."

    What is "haul about" here mean? = to talk about? and

    what is the "grieving widder" mean? I couldn't find the word "widder" in the dictionary.

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    He made every plea to logic and emotion when he explained why he needed time to look into the matter before the public could know what had happened. But she gave no response.

    "Well, if there's a circus about us, if the press savages our methods as they do, what can be discovered?"

    "if there's a circus about us" here mean people would come to look what happened in this house (the murder)?

    "what can be discovered?" = discover that the judge died nakedly and horribly (the body had been maggot-ridden and layered in flies and wasps)? or what can be discovered? = nothing will be explainable because the police itself doesn't know what happened to the body? or who killed the guy??

    Tks,
    Last edited by beeja; 01-Jun-2007 at 08:54.

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    #4

    Re: pls helpppp

    is it a book or an essay? it seems interesting.
    anyway, i don't know what is this talking about @@

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    #5

    Unhappy Re: pls helpppp

    It's a book called The Dante Club, very interesting but very difficult for non-native english like me but i MUST understand it VERY CLEARY for my final report.


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    #6

    Re: pls helpppp

    Quote Originally Posted by beeja View Post
    Ednah Healey wept slowly at first, as a woman might for a dead household pet—reflective and governed but without anger. The olive-brown feather protruding from her hat nodded with dignified resistance.

    Nell looked at Mrs. Healey longingly, then said with great humanity, “You ought to come back later in the day, Chief Kurtz, if you please.”

    Does "longingly" here imply that the servant would like to calm that woman down or console her? I think this is a reasonable explanation

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    "You and your deputies are to keep this completely confidential, by the order of the mayor."

    "Oh, very like." He laughed quickly, irresponsibly, like a child. "Well, old Healey would have been an awfully fat man to haul about. At least we can trust it was not the grieving widder."

    What is "haul about" here mean? = to talk about? and The dead man was fat, so his body would have been difficult to pull along or move

    what is the "grieving widder" mean? I couldn't find the word "widder" in the dictionary. colloquial form of "widow"

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    He made every plea to logic and emotion when he explained why he needed time to look into the matter before the public could know what had happened. But she gave no response.

    "Well, if there's a circus about us, if the press savages our methods as they do, what can be discovered?"

    "if there's a circus about us" here mean people would come to look what happened in this house (the murder)? Yes

    "what can be discovered?" = discover that the judge died nakedly and horribly (the body had been maggot-ridden and layered in flies and wasps)? or what can be discovered? = nothing will be explainable because the police itself doesn't know what happened to the body? or who killed the guy = the "media circus" will prevent the police from carrying out their work properly.??

    Tks,
    ..

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    #7

    Re: pls helpppp

    Thank you.

    By the way, do you know why Harvard (or other university) called the professor "The Smith Professor" or "The Parkman Professor", it is a title?

    Ex:

    George Ticknor was the first Smith Professor of French and Spanish languages and literature.

    Holmes was the Parkman anatomy of chair or the Parkman Chair of Anatomy.

    Some web said "The Smith Professor" is a named chair professor but I don't understand. Does it mean that Professor (like Ticknor) had a chair in the committee who was named (assigned) by Smith? If so, does the Parkman = Mr. Parkman sponsored Mr. Holmes to be professor? So weird for me!!! Pls help again, tks.


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    #8

    Re: pls helpppp

    The position [Smith Professor/Parkman Professor] is named after a meritorious person who was a leading figure in the field or for someone who has given the university funds.

    I've found this reference which must refer to the Smith Chair: and the date which may be set for that beginning is 1816. In that year Abiel Smith. bequeathed to the University the sum of $20,000

    This is about Dr Parkman =
    George Parkman, prominent physician and member of the Boston Brahmin elite who was murdered! American Experience | Murder at Harvard | People & Events

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    #9

    Re: pls helpppp

    So, can we say that "Parkman Professor" and "Smith Professor" are the titles but okay, maybe in different field, like if it belongs to medical field, then go to Parkman Professor, etc.

    However, when we call "Smith Professor George Ticknor" George Ticknor is nothing to do with Mr. Smith who donated money to the university, right? but I still wondered why not call him "Professor George Ticknor" if he had nothing to do with Smith fund.

    This thing never occurs in my country, so it's pretty hard for me to understand, pls be patient!!!


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    #10

    Re: pls helpppp

    Quote Originally Posted by beeja View Post
    So, can we say that "Parkman Professor" and "Smith Professor" are the titles but okay, maybe in different field, like if it belongs to medical field, then go to Parkman Professor, etc.

    However, when we call "Smith Professor George Ticknor" George Ticknor is nothing to do with Mr. Smith who donated money to the university, right? but I still wondered why not call him "Professor George Ticknor" if he had nothing to do with Smith fund.

    This thing never occurs in my country, so it's pretty hard for me to understand, pls be patient!!!
    Forget any direct personal connection between the person holding the position and the person after which is was named!

    If you are talking about someone in the present day, the person in the position will always be called Professor XXXXXX in general use. He is formally referred to as George Ticknor, Smith Professor of Romance Languages, and can be referred to as the incumbent of the Smith Chair.

    Don't let it worry you - these are people in the past. You do not need to give them a title when writing about them. Refer to them by name, and mention that they held the xxxxxx Professorship; then don't refer to it again
    .

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