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    #1

    A Is to B What C Is to D

    Anyone please help.
    Exercise is to the body what reading is to the mind.
    What part of speech is "what" in the sentence? I thought it was a relative pronoun .... Is it a conjunction since it is interchangeable with "as," which is a conjunction there?

    Best,

    Hiro

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    #2

    Re: A Is to B What C Is to D

    I'd agree that it's a relative pronoun.

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    #3

    Re: A Is to B What C Is to D

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I'd agree that it's a relative pronoun.
    With the 'what' being a relative pronoun, can the whole sentence be paraphrased as

    Exercise is (what reading is to the mind) to the body

    ?

    Hiro


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    #4

    Re: A Is to B What C Is to D

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    With the 'what' being a relative pronoun, can the whole sentence be paraphrased as

    Exercise is (what reading is to the mind) to the body

    ?

    Hiro
    No, I don't think so. As anything between brackets (or parentheses) is an aclaration, the sentence should make sense without the "aclaration".

    By the way, I think these sentences were called "analogies". A:B :: C:D

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    #5

    Re: A Is to B What C Is to D

    I agree with TDOL what works here as a relative iintroducing a nominal relative clause.
    let's change the order of the sentence:
    What reading is to the mind, exercise is to the body.
    The odd thing is that what as a relative refers to a nominal group in absentiae : /what is /reading to the mind is infered ( that are the virtues: stimulating the mind..). I think this inference device strenghtens the effect given off bythe analogy.

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    #6

    Re: A Is to B What C Is to D

    Gee ... What is an aclaration, and what is absentiae?

    Hiro

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    #7

    Re: A Is to B What C Is to D

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    Gee ... What is an aclaration, and what is absentiae?

    Hiro
    aclaration - something that makes something else clear, clarifying it

    absentia is Latin for absence. In (in the sense used here) takes the ablative, so the phrase should be in absentia; I'm not sure where Alain's -ae comes from - it's probably a typo. In absentia means 'in [its] absence'.

    b

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    #8

    Re: A Is to B What C Is to D

    We easily recognize Latin lovers ( there is no pun ). Thank you Bob for the correction and the explanation. How do you do ?

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