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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Question "On Yesterday"

    I have a question about using the word "on."

    I believe it would be correct to say "I will see you tomorrow," but incorrect to say "I will see you on tomorrow." However, I believe it would be correct to say "I will see you on Saturday" and also correct to say "I will see you Saturday."

    Are my beliefs correct? The reason I ask is, I have met people in urban areas who use "on" in front of the words yesterday, today, and tomorrow, in sentences such as "He called me on yesterday." I would have said "He called me yesterday."

    Is it correct to use "on" in this manner? I've never seen it used that way in literature or in written English, only in urban American spoken English. Is it something new? Should I correct my nephew when he says "on yesterday?"

    Thank you.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "On Yesterday"

    No, "on yesterday" is not correct.

    Whether you want to correct others is up to you, of course. :)

  3. engee30's Avatar
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    #3

    Talking Re: "On Yesterday"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    The reason I ask is, I have met people in urban areas who use "on" in front of the words yesterday, today, and tomorrow, in sentences such as "He called me on yesterday." I would have said "He called me yesterday."

    Is it correct to use "on" in this manner? I've never seen it used that way in literature or in written English, only in urban American spoken English. Is it something new? Should I correct my nephew when he says "on yesterday?"

    Thank you.
    Your nephew might as well have been mistaken for another reason - call (in) on somebody is a phrasal verb. So, maybe he wanted to say that he visited you yesterday (and you weren't in then). The trouble is that this phrasal verb is inseparable - even when you use a pronoun (like me), you ALWAYS put it after the preposition.

    He called (in) on me yesterday.

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