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    #1

    It becomes a curse to him

    The gift of immortality becomes a curse to/for him since he will suffer for his entire life.
    Is the sentence above ok?
    Should I say to him or for him?
    Thank you

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    I prefer for in this context, though if I used it I'd change the last clause to something like 'The gift of immortality becomes a curse for him since it condemns him to an eternity of surffering.'

    b


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    #3

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I prefer for in this context, though if I used it I'd change the last clause to something like 'The gift of immortality becomes a curse for him since it condemns him to an eternity of surffering.'

    b
    Thank you for your reply.
    The last clause you proposed sounds better than mine. I'm not even sure if since can be followed by a future tense verb. Is it correct?
    Last edited by Englishlanguage; 10-Jun-2007 at 16:24.

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    #4

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    Thank you for your reply.
    The last clause you proposed sounds better than mine. I'm not even sure if since can be followed by a future tense verb. Is it correct?
    Well, it can. I don't think it's right here though. Immortality has become a curse for him since it means that he will spend an eternity (more than 'a life') suffering. The verb that immediately follows since should follow from the first clause; example - 'He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he will have to pay a higher fare'.

    b


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    #5

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Well, it can. I don't think it's right here though. Immortality has become a curse for him since it means that he will spend an eternity (more than 'a life') suffering. The verb that immediately follows since should follow from the first clause; example - 'He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he will have to pay a higher fare'.

    b
    Isn't would ok in this sentence?
    He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he should pay a higher fare.
    It sounds more natural to me.

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    #6

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    Isn't would ok in this sentence?
    He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he should pay a higher fare.
    It sounds more natural to me.
    (with 'would', not 'should')

    Either of these is acceptable:

    He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he will have to pay a higher fare [if he travels then].

    He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he would have to pay a higher fare [if he travelled then].


    I chose the first so as to show since with the simple future.

    b


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    #7

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    (with 'would', not 'should')

    Either of these is acceptable:

    He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he will have to pay a higher fare [if he travels then].

    He doesn't want to travel at the weekend since he would have to pay a higher fare [if he travelled then].


    I chose the first so as to show since with the simple future.

    b
    Really? I've always been told I should never use would have to because the conditional of have to is should. Have I always been told wrong?

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    #8

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    Really? I've always been told I should never use would have to because the conditional of have to is should. Have I always been told wrong?
    I'm not sure what you've been told, but "would have to" is fine. And should is wrong in your sentence. You could say 'He was guilty of theft since he should have paid for his journey. In contexts that include the word 'since', 'should' means 'ought to' - I think (any other views?).

    b


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    #9

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I'm not sure what you've been told, but "would have to" is fine. And should is wrong in your sentence. You could say 'He was guilty of theft since he should have paid for his journey. In contexts that include the word 'since', 'should' means 'ought to' - I think (any other views?).

    b
    I have always been told that it is incorrect to say would have to because the conditional of to have to is should, not would have to.
    Example:
    I knew she would have to pay the ticket. correct
    I knew she should pay the ticket. incorrect
    Last edited by Englishlanguage; 11-Jun-2007 at 14:19.

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    #10

    Re: It becomes a curse to him

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    I have always been told that it is incorrect to say would have to because the conditional of to have to is should, not would have to.
    Example:
    I knew she would have to pay for the ticket. correct
    I knew she should pay the ticket. incorrect
    Your example is correct (except for the 'for'), but it doesn't follow your 'rule' I'll have to think about it more to work out what you have been taught and why.

    b

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