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      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 25
    #1

    the day after

    Dear teachers,

    I have a question.

    Do "the day after" and "the next day" have the same meaning?

    And can I use "the day after" in place of "the next day"
    in the following sentence?

    : He told me that he was going to leave the next day.

    Thank you, in advance.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: the day after

    Welcome, norae99.

    First, your example sentence is ambiguous. Which verb does the adverb next day modify, told (1.) or leave (2.)?

    Ex: He told me that he was going to leave the next day.

    1. He told me the next day that he was going to leave.
    2. He told me he was going to leave the next day.

    The phrase the day after works the same way, but admits more ambiguity:

    Ex: The day after he told me (he was going to leave), he left.
    Ex: He left the day after he told me (he was going to leave).

    Both sentences could mean,

    1. He told me on Monday that he was going to leave on Tuesday, and he did leave on Tueday.
    2. He told me he was going to leave on Tuesday, but he left on Wednesday.


    Does that help?
    Last edited by Casiopea; 16-Jun-2007 at 05:42.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 25
    #3

    Re: the day after

    Thank you for your answer, Casiopea

    I originally wanted to write the example sentence as an indirect speech form of this sentence: He said to me, "I'm going to leave tomorrow."

    So, the adverb next day modifies the verb leave.

    In that case, can I use the phrase the day after in place of the phrase the next day like ex. 2?

    Ex. 1: He told me that he was going to leave the next day.
    Ex. 2: He told me that he was going to leave the day after.

    Thank you in advance.

    p.s. I'm reading a English grammar book these days, and it says that we have to make time and place changes in relation to tense changes when making indirect statements.

    yesterday -> the previous day, the day before
    tomorrow -> the next day, the following day

    Reading these examples, I wanted to know if I could use the day after in place of the next day in that these two phrases exist: the day before yesterday and the day after tomorrow.
    Last edited by norae99; 17-Jun-2007 at 06:47.


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 38
    #4

    Re: the day after

    Hello, norae99.

    My guess, as a non-native, is NO, you can't change those phrases. Just take a look:

    The day before yesterday = the day before 'the day before'
    The day after tomorrow = the day after 'the following day'

    Sounds horrible. If you can use the existing form, why bother create new ones that don't even sound right?

    Hope it helps,

    Trisia

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: the day after

    norae99, the indirect variants, both the next day and the day after, are still ambiguous. You'll need to define when the next day is, when the day after is. For example,

    direct speech: He said to me, "I'm going to leave tomorrow."

    indirect speech: He told me yesterday that he was going to leave today.
    As for your second question, try these:

    Ex: He told me that he was going to leave the day after yesterday. (which is today).

    Ex: He told me yesterday that he was going to leave the next day. (which is today)
    Note, using today or a specific day would be your best choice. It's clear.

    Does that help?

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