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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    like to being/be

    I like to being/be an employee, I don't want to become a owner.

    Please tell me which one is correct. [If both are correct, please tell me, is there is difference in the meanings?]

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #2

    Re: like to being/be

    I like being an employee.
    I would like to be an employee.

  2. bianca's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: like to being/be

    Examples of sentences with 'to being':

    They look forward to being invited to the party.

    They objected to being treated that way.

    There is more to being a teacher than you think.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: like to being/be

    Say:
    I like being an employee. I don't want to be an owner.
    (You can't say "I like to be an employee", but you can say (as Cas noted) "I would like to be an employee", which is something entirely different.)

    ~R


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #5

    Re: like to being/be

    Could you tell me, what is the difference?

    I like to be an employee.

    I would like to be an employee.

  4. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: like to being/be

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    Could you tell me, what is the difference?

    I like to be an employee.

    I would like to be an employee.
    The first is a general statement. The second expresses your wish.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #7

    Re: like to being/be

    Quote Originally Posted by bianca View Post
    Examples of sentences with 'to being':

    They look forward to being invited to the party.

    They objected to being treated that way.

    There is more to being a teacher than you think.
    I know `being' is used only for temporary things.

    So, do all your examples are temporary? I mean (to being a teacher - Is the teacher is being appointed for temporary)

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    #8

    Re: like to being/be

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    I know `being' is used only for temporary things.

    So, do all your examples are temporary? I mean (to being a teacher - Is the teacher is being appointed for temporary)
    No, being is not present continuous here but gerund.
    Like is one of the verbs which can take both the gerund and the infinitive depending upon the meaning. When like means enjoy it takes the gerund but when it refers to choices it takes the infinitive:

    I like being an employee (I enjoy the state of being an employee)
    I like to be an employee (is grammatically correct but doesn't really make sense unless the speaker has been offered two different jobs to choose from).

  5. RonBee's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: like to being/be

    So being is only used for temporary things? (I had never heard that before.)

    (Say: "Are all of your examples...?")

    ~R

  6. #10

    Re: like to being/be

    [quote=user_gary;182610]I know `being' is used only for temporary things.

    Hi,
    'be' + 'being' (can mean "acting" or "behaving") does refer to temporary states.
    e.g. He is being a jerk (He isn't always a jerk but is behaving that way at the moment)
    Other verbs + 'being' do not have the same meaning. As Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim pointed out, it is functioning as a gerund object in your example.

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