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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #1

    put through

    (While making a phone call to a hotel)
    Hello. May I talk to Mr Smith?


    Which other expressions can be used instead of the above one?
    Is Can you put me through Mr Smith? ok? What about to put on?
    Is there any other expression which can be used?

  1. bianca's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Swedish
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      • Sweden
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    • Join Date: Apr 2007
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    #2

    Re: put through

    Could you put me through to Mr.... (maybe BE) - more formal, I guess, office-language. It is used when you know you have to be passed to a different telephone extension.

    Could you put him on (the phone)? (AE) - colloquial, used when you just want the other person to call him to the phone or hand the phone to him.

    (but the answer is: "just hold on for a second,I will put you through").
    Last edited by bianca; 17-Jun-2007 at 20:18.


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 556
    #3

    Re: put through

    "Can you connect me with Mr. Smith, please?" or "May I speak with John Smith, please?" or even just "John Smith, please."

    "Can you put me through to Mr. Smith?" is correct, but a little old-fashioned to my ears. It conjures visions of the old-time switchboard operators.

    "Put on" is often heard: "Can I put you on hold, ma'am?" or "I'm going to put on my manager now to verify the terms of your contract" but I would not ask a hotel operator to "Put on Mr. Smith, please."

    [I am a native speaker and hold a college degree in English, but am not a teacher.]


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #4

    Re: put through

    Quote Originally Posted by bianca View Post
    Could you put me through to Mr.... (maybe BE) - more formal, I guess, office-language. It is used when you know you have to be passed to a different telephone extension.

    Could you put him on (the phone)? (AE) - colloquial, used when you just want the other person to call him to the phone or hand the phone to him.

    (but the answer is: "just hold on for a second,I will put you through").
    Thank you bianca.
    But there's something I don't understand. What do you exactly mean by a different telephon extension?


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #5

    Re: put through

    Quote Originally Posted by Delmobile View Post
    "Put on" is often heard: "Can I put you on hold, ma'am?" or "I'm going to put on my manager now to verify the terms of your contract" but I would not ask a hotel operator to "Put on Mr. Smith, please."
    I'm not sure I understand what put on hold means. Does it just mean that the person who has called is required to hold on?

  2. bianca's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Swedish
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      • Sweden
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    • Join Date: Apr 2007
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    #6

    Re: put through

    A telephone extension is an additional telephone set that is connected to the same telephone line. In other words, you are connected to someone whose office (or phone) is in another room or building, speaking from another telephone than the operator's, but connected to the same line.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #7

    Re: put through

    Quote Originally Posted by bianca View Post
    A telephone extension is an additional telephone set that is connected to the same telephone line. In other words, you are connected to someone whose office (or phone) is in another room or building, speaking from another telephone than the operator's, but connected to the same line.
    Oh yes. I understand now. Could to put through to be used when talking to a hotel operator?


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 556
    #8

    Re: put through

    "on hold:" Yes, exactly. You are literally "holding the phone" while the person on the other end is doing something else. When I put you "on hold," you are still connected, but you can no longer hear what I am saying.

    The expression "hold the phone" is also used idiomatically, to mean "wait." "Hey, hold the phone---I didn't say I would buy pizza for you and your friends. I only said I would take care of your dinner tonight. We have leftovers in the refrigerator at home."

  3. bianca's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Swedish
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      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Apr 2007
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    #9

    Re: put through

    Sure you can!


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #10

    Re: put through

    Quote Originally Posted by Delmobile View Post
    The expression "hold the phone" is also used idiomatically, to mean "wait." "Hey, hold the phone---I didn't say I would buy pizza for you and your friends. I only said I would take care of your dinner tonight. We have leftovers in the refrigerator at home."
    Thank you. I didn't know this idimoatic use.

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