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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    parecian el uno para el otro

    Como se dice en ingles: parecian el uno para el otro?


    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #2

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    This is an ENGLISH LANGUAGE FORUM. You need to ask in ENGLISH.


    p.s. PARECIAN doesn't mean anything, as far as I know. Maybe PARECEN...


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
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    #3

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    I'm sorry.
    I wanted to know if somebody knows what is the english expression for this literal translation from spanish:
    "They look one made for the other"
    meaning that two people or beings get along very very well.

    Thank you very much for your help
    Last edited by mesil; 19-Jun-2007 at 19:31.

  2. #4

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    I would say: "They were made for each other." or less direct "They seem as if they were made for each other."

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    And if they're married "It's a marriage made in Heaven".

    b

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    Quote Originally Posted by mesil View Post
    I'm sorry.
    I wanted to know if somebody knows what is the english expression for this literal translation from spanish:
    "They look one made for the other"
    meaning that two people or beings get along very very well.

    Thank you very much for your help
    Don't worry mesil . If you want to speak your own language, there's a forum for it: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/other-languages/; and there are teachers here that speak quite a few other languages. But if you want answers from a wider range of teachers, you need to use English.

    b

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    Here's another one: 'They're as like as two peas in a pod'. This use of 'as like as' is not very current, so the expression frequently takes this form: 'They're like two peas in a pod'.

    Or: 'They're like brothers/sisters/brother and sister'.

    And if they are frequently seen together: 'They're joined at the hip.'

    If you don't insist on using an idiom, you could just say 'They're [very] alike'.

    b


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
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    #8

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    THANKS EVERYBODY!!!! You were extremely helpful!! That expression 'They're like two peas in a pod' is the one that I heard in Forrest Gump, but I couldn't remember! How common is that expression? I think I've never heard it in real life. Thanks BobK for the link.
    William Strunk Jr, thank you too!!

  6. #9

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'They're as like as two peas in a pod'.
    Should be: 'They're as alike as two peas in a pod'.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: parecian el uno para el otro

    Quote Originally Posted by William Strunk Jr View Post
    Should be: 'They're as alike as two peas in a pod'.
    I do make the odd typo, but I didn't here.

    Like many other proverbs, it uses an old form of the word that has become standardized as "alike"; and a lot of people who aren't familiar with the old form - which they have learned to regard as mistaken - 'correct' it by adding an initial a-. The version I'm more familiar with is 'like as two peas in a pod'. There's an example here (you have to scroll down a bit): Jack London: The Valley of the Moon: Chapter III - Free Online Library .

    Here's what Answers .com says about the adjective "like":
    adj.

    1. Possessing the same or almost the same characteristics; similar: on this and like occasions.
    2. Alike: They are as like as two siblings.
    3. Having equivalent value or quality. Usually used in negative sentences: There's nothing like a good night's sleep.
    See more here: like: Definition, Synonyms and Much More from Answers.com

    Mesil: yes, the idiom is quite commonly used. As is suggested by its use in Forrest Gump, it sounds rather 'homely'.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 21-Jun-2007 at 18:08.

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