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    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #1

    She was seen to cross the road (by me).

    Just wonder why there's 'to' in this passive form
    'She was seen to cross the road (by me).', while there's no 'to' in active sentence "I saw her cross the road."
    I just know it should be, but can't explain 'why'.
    And one more question!
    'He asked me some questions.'in active form
    'Some questions were asked of me (by him).'
    I don't get it and think it should be 'to', not 'of'. And If second one is grammartically right, it is somewhat different from the first one in meaning.
    Anybodys know it, plz reply.
    thank you!
    Last edited by sanctuarylsw; 19-Jun-2007 at 11:32. Reason: addition


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
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    #2

    Re: She was seen to cross the road (by me).

    In active form there would be I saw her crossing the street, therefore no "TO" belongs there.


    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #3

    Re: She was seen to cross the road (by me).

    I think it has two kinds of active forms. One is like you said, 'I saw her crossing the road.' And the other is, 'I saw her cross the road.'
    These two sentences have a little difference in meaning. The former means 'As I looked, she crossed it from one side to the other.', and the latter 'As I looked, she was crossing it-she was in the middle, on her way across.'
    In the latter, it should be 'She was seen to cross the road.'
    It's just all that I know of these two kinds of structure.
    Am I wrong? I'm not sure.
    If you know more about it, pls commend something.


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
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    #4

    Re: She was seen to cross the road (by me).

    You are right, even though 'I saw her crossing the road.' would be better, because there is one activity (I saw her) interrupting another activity that is already in progress (she is crossing the road). But you can use the other one too, to describe the fact that she just crossed (finished crossing). In that case is in the active form the word "to"used as well. So you can choose:
    I saw her to cross the road
    She was seen to cross the road (by me)
    I saw her crossing the road.
    She was seen crossing the road


    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #5

    Re: She was seen to cross the road (by me).

    Thank you, again.
    But I have still one more question. Sorry to bother you.
    Just about the one sentense you wrote, 'I saw her to cross the road.', I've never seen this kind of sentence and I can't get why you wrote 'to' in front of cross. Is it just a spellin error, or you can also write it that way?
    I thought it should be 'I saw her cross the road.'
    If you didn't misspel it, could you tell me what function to-infinitive has?
    and what's different from bare-infinitive?


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
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    #6

    Re: She was seen to cross the road (by me).

    I am not a native speaker, so I could be mistaken, but I thig that "to" can be omitted, but it is not a mistake to use it. Try some native speaker as well. However, I would use the -ing form, because that is surely the best.

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