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Thread: adding s


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #31
    "Explain the possible effects of human activity on the natural environment of Kapuskasing." <--'effects' is plural? why isn't 'human activity' plural too?

    "Explain the possible effects of human activities on the natural environment of Kapuskasing."

    "Explain the possible effect of human activities on the natural environment of Kapuskasing."

    "Explain the possible effect of human activity on the natural environment of Kapuskasing."

    What does each one of these mean?

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    #32
    1- different effects of general activity (life)
    2- different effects of different activities (industry, agriculture, construction)
    3- general effect of different activities
    4 general effect of human presence

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    #33
    When we use the word activity in general terms we usually mean more than one action. In that context, there is no meaningful difference between activity and activities (in my opinion).

    (Of course, Tdol's explanation was excellent.)

    :wink:

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    #34
    It's just a tiny shift of emphasis, IMO.


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    #35
    "What is the best video file sharing program which contain mostly movies?" <--Is this question correct? what is the subject and verb in this sentence? How do I know? Should "contain" be "contains"? why and why not?

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    #36
    It should be 'contains' because it is third person singular.


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    #37
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It should be 'contains' because it is third person singular.
    Third person singular? How do you know? When should it not have an "s" then? Do you have some sites where i can pratice more of this?



    "How do you actually get fined for downloading music?" <-- correct? what does this question mean?
    "How do you actually get fines for downloading music?" <-- correct? what does this question mean?

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    #38
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It should be 'contains' because it is third person singular.
    Third person singular? How do you know? When should it not have an "s" then? Do you have some sites where i can pratice more of this?



    "How do you actually get fined for downloading music?" <-- correct? what does this question mean?
    "How do you actually get fines for downloading music?" <-- correct? what does this question mean?
    In the first sentence, fined is a verb. In the second sentence, fines is a noun. The sentences mean about the same thing, which is: "What is the process for incurring fines for downloading music?" (How do they find out you did it and then fine you for it.)

    :)


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    #39
    "How do you actually get fined for downloading music?"
    "How do you actually get fines for downloading music?"

    How do i know "fined" is a verb in the first sentence? It is because it has a "ed" in the end? what is the rule for it?

    For the second sentence, how do i know if "fines" is a noun? b/c of the "s" in the end??


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    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "How do you actually get fined for downloading music?"
    "How do you actually get fines for downloading music?"

    How do i know "fined" is a verb in the first sentence? It is because it has a "ed" in the end? what is the rule for it?

    For the second sentence, how do i know if "fines" is a noun? b/c of the "s" in the end??
    You can use get in a causative way (it works kind of like the passive forms) and it must be followed by the past participle. That is why in the fisrt sentence we know it is a verb form.

    You can also use get as a normal transitive verb followed by a noun (in this case the direct object), that is how we know in the second sentence that it's a noun and not a verb.

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