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Thread: adding s


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #41
    "Wouldn't you say code instead of command"? <--correct? Does it mean One "command and one "code"?
    "Wouldn't you say codes instead of commands"? <--correct? Does it mean more then one "code" and "command"?


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #42
    "What if someone else joins your clan?" <---correct? What is the subject and verb in this sentence?

    "What if someone else join your clan?" <---correct? What is the subject and verb in this sentence?

    "I don't have any spyware/adware/trojans/virus on my computer." <--correct? what does it mean?
    "I don't have any spywares/adwares/trojans/viruses on my computer." <--correct? what does it mean?

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #43
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "Wouldn't you say code instead of command"? <--correct? Does it mean One "command and one "code"?
    "Wouldn't you say codes instead of commands"? <--correct? Does it mean more then one "code" and "command"?
    In the first sentence, code and command are used in the singular. Certainly, in the second sentence, codes and commands are plural.

    :)

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #44
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    What if someone else joins your clan?" <---correct? What is the subject and verb in this sentence?
    Subject: someone else
    Verb: joins

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "What if someone else join your clan?" <---correct? What is the subject and verb in this sentence?
    Subject: someone else
    Verb: join

    It is grammatically incorrect.

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "I don't have any spyware/adware/trojans/virus on my computer." <--correct? what does it mean?
    Say, "I don't have any viruses on my computer", not "I don't have any virus on my computer."

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "I don't have any spywares/adwares/trojans/viruses on my computer." <--correct? what does it mean?
    It is correct. It means your computer does not have any of those programs "infesting" it.

    :)


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    #45


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #46
    Thanks guys.


    1."Thank You."
    2."Thanks.
    3."Thank." <--when would you use this?

    Is there any difference in meaning between the first one and the second one?

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #47
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks guys.


    1."Thank You."
    2."Thanks.
    3."Thank." <--when would you use this?

    Is there any difference in meaning between the first one and the second one?
    Use 1 or 2, but not 3.

    The first one is a little more formal than the second one.

    :)

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #48
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks guys.


    1."Thank You."
    2."Thanks.
    3."Thank." <--when would you use this?

    Is there any difference in meaning between the first one and the second one?
    I agree with RonBee's explanation.

    In addition, Thanks is plural, notice the -s, and it's short for Many thanks. There's also a spelling variation (informal):

    Thanks ~ Thanx (The sound [ks] is written as "x")

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #49
    "He does it from time to time to make it looks like an accident." <--correct?
    "He does it from time to time to make it look like an accident." <--incorrect? why?

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #50
    "He does it from time to time to make it looks like an accident." incorrect
    "He does it from time to time to make it look like an accident." correct

    The reason is that the second is we use the infinitive without 'to' after 'make', so it doesn't take the 's' or show tense:
    He makes me do it.
    He made me do it.
    He makes her do it.


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