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Thread: adding s


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #51
    "He does it from time to time to make it look like an accident." correct. What is the subject and verb in this sentence?

    The reason is that the second is we use the infinitive without 'to' after 'make', so it doesn't take the 's' or show tense.

    I still don't really understand this.
    "It looks like an accident." <--"looks" is plural b/c "it" is singular.

    Why in that sentenence "look" is singular after "it"?

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    #52
    It's notplural. With verbs, we put 's' for he\she\it, but not for the plural we\they.

    'S' fo the pluralis with nouns, not verbs.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #53
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "He does it from time to time to make it look like an accident." correct. What is the subject and verb in this sentence?
    He (Subject)
    does (verb)
    it (object)
    from time to time (Adverb. It answers the question, "When does he do it?")
    to make it look like an accident (Adverb of purpose. It answers the question, "Why does he do it?"

    Structure
    EX: to make him look good

    to make doesn't have -s because 'to make' doesn't have a subject to agree with in number; 'him' is not the subject of 'look'; 'him' is the object of 'to make'. 'look' doesn't have a subject either, so -s is not added.

    The reason is that the second is we use the infinitive without 'to' after 'make', so it doesn't take the 's' or show tense.
    The -s represents number agreement. If the subject is singular (she, he, it), then the verb is marked singular by adding an -s: She makes / He makes / It makes

    Note that, singular "you" is an exception: You make.

    If the subject is plural (They, We, You), then -s in not added: They make/We make/You make

    If there is no subject at all, then -s in not added,

    to make him look
    to make them look

    I still don't really understand this.
    "It looks like an accident." <--"looks" is plural b/c "it" is singular.

    Why in that sentenence "look" is singular after "it"?
    [/quote]

    'it' is singular in number; that is, 'it' means "a thing", one, so add -s to the verb,

    It looks.
    She looks.
    He looks.

    Do not add -s if the subject is plural,

    They look.
    We look.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #54
    "It gives you errors?" <--correct? why? what is the subject and verb?
    "It gives you error?" <--correct? why?

    You kill him. <--correct? There is no "s" after "you" for "kill". Is it because the subject is "You?
    You kills him. <--incorrect.

    "It gives you kills." <--correct? why? There is an "s" after you for "kill". Is it because the subject is "It"? what is the subject and verb?
    "It gives you kill." <--correct? why?
    "It gives you killed." <--incorrect? why?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #55
    1. "It gives you errors?"
    ==> Without context, it's an odd sounding sentence, but, nonetheless grammatically correct as is. "errors" functions as a plural noun. The verb give is di-transitive. It takes two objects, a direct object (errors) and an indirect object (me). To determine which is which, rearrange the sentence like this,

    It gives errors to you?. (indirect object) :D
    It give you errors? (indirect object) :D

    2. "It gives you error"
    ==>Incorrect. 'error' is a singular noun, a count noun, so it needs a(n), like this,

    It gives you an error. :D

    3. You kill him. :D
    4. You kills him. :( (Incorrect)

    5. "It gives you kills." :(
    ==> 'kills' is a verb. You need a noun there. Remember, the verb 'give' takes two nominal objects. In 5., you have a nominal (you) and a verb (kills).

    6. "It gives you kill." :(
    ==> 'kill' is a verb.

    7. "It gives you killed." :(
    ==> 'killed' is a verbal.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #56
    "what brings you back?" <--incorrect? why? what is the subject and verb?
    "what bring you back?" <--correct? why?
    "what bought you back?" <--correct? why?

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #57
    "what bring you back?" :(
    "what bought you back?" :D

    What brings you back. (Subject, verb)

    what is singular in number, so it takes a singular verb.

    I bring
    you bring
    s/he brings
    it/what brings
    they bring
    we bring

    I brought
    you brought
    s/he brought
    it/what brought
    they brought
    we brought


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #58
    "Where can I get some information about this store?" <--correct? why? What is the subject and verb?
    "Where can I get some informations about this store?" <--incorrect? why?

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #59
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "Where can I get some information about this store?" <--correct? why? What is the subject and verb?
    "Where can I get some informations about this store?" <--incorrect? why?
    You can get information about this store at the counter over there.
    Where can I get information about this store?

    Subject "I"

    Note, the word information is non-count, which means, it never takes -s.

    information :D
    informations :(


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "Where can I get some information about this store?" <--correct? why? What is the subject and verb?
    "Where can I get some informations about this store?" <--incorrect? why?
    You can get information about this store at the counter over there.
    Where can I get information about this store?

    Subject "I"

    Note, the word information is non-count, which means, it never takes -s.

    information :D
    informations :(

    Is there any extra meanings to the underlined words? Is that the verb? If so, how?
    "Where can I get some information about this store?" <--What is the verb"?

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