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Thread: adding s

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #61
    You can get information about this store at the counter over there.
    Where can I get information about this store?

    'at the counter over there' represents 'where'. They are one and the same. You can replace one with the other:

    At the counter over there can I get information about this store?
    Where can I get information about this store?

    The verb main verb is 'can'. It takes an object, 'get': can get.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #62
    Thanks.

    "There is a car accident over there." <--okay, I know this is correct.

    "There is a ten car accident over there." <--is this correct? It looks kind of awkward to me? How can i fix it?

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #63
    Ten car accidents = 10 separate accidents

    a ten-car accidenet = 1 accident involving ten cars



    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #64
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Ten car accidents = 10 separate accidents

    a ten-car accidenet = 1 accident involving ten cars

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Ten car accidents = 10 separate accidents

    a ten-car accidenet = 1 accident involving ten cars

    "There is a ten car accidents over there." <--so this is correct?
    "There is a ten car accident over there." <--this is incorrect?

    There are ten cars accidents over there. <--is this sentence correct? meaning 10 separate car accidents?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #65
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Ten car accidents = 10 separate accidents

    a ten-car accident = 1 accident involving ten cars

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Ten car accidents = 10 separate accidents

    a ten-car accidenet = 1 accident involving ten cars

    1. "There is a ten car accidents over there." <--so this is correct?
    2. "There is a ten car accident over there." <--this is incorrect?

    3. There are ten cars accidents over there. <--is this sentence correct? meaning 10 separate car accidents?
    1. is incorrect. Notice the article "a" and the noun "accidents". The article "a" goes with singular nouns only. "accidents" is plural. :wink:

    2. is correct.

    3. is incorrect. Notice the word "cars". Even though it's a plural noun, in our sentence 3. it functions as an adjective. Adjectives don't take -s. Only nouns takes -s.

    There are ten car accidents over there. (OK)

    What kind of accidents? => Car accidents. "Car" functions as an adjective.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #66
    "There is a ten car accident over there." <--I understand your explanation but why doesn't "ten" make "car" or "accident" plural?

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #67
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "There is a ten car accident over there." <--I understand your explanation but why doesn't "ten" make "car" or "accident" plural?
    Because "a" overrides it.

    a [ten-car] accident

    "a" modifies in number "accident" (i.e., how many accidents? One), "ten-car" modifies "accident" in kind (i.e., what kind of accident); descriptive adjectives e.g., 'ten-car' do not agree in number with the nouns they modify.

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #68
    It's the same as 'shoe shop'- one shop, but it has many shoes. It behaves as an adjective, and they don't have plurals.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #69
    "Itís a little kidís toy." <--incorrect? why? what does it mean?
    "Its a little kidís toy." <--correct? why? what does it mean?

    "Itís a little kids' game." <--correct? why? what does it mean?
    "Its a little kids' game." <--correct? why? what does it mean?

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #70
    "Itís a little kidís toy." <--incorrect? why? what does it mean?
    "Its a little kidís toy." <--correct? why? what does it mean?
    The first is correct- it's = it is


    "Itís a little kids' game." <--correct? why? what does it mean?
    "Its a little kids' game." <--correct? why? what does it mean?
    The first is correct- it's = it is

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