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Thread: adding s


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #71
    "I have six A's on my report card." <--correct? what does it mean?
    "I have six As on my report card." <--correct? what does it mean?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #72
    "I have six A's on my report card." :( Uppercase
    "I have six As on my report card." :D Uppercase

    Quote Originally Posted by Owl
    Apostrophes are used to form plurals of letters that appear in lowercase; here the rule appears to be more typographical than grammatical, e.g. "three ps" versus "three p's." To form the plural of a lowercase letter, place 's after the letter.

    Lowercase letters
    p's and q's (means, pleases and thankyous)

    There is no need for apostrophes indicating a plural on capitalized letters, numbers, and symbols (though keep in mind that some editors, teachers, and professors still prefer them).

    Uppercase letters
    Three Macintosh G4s (means, G4 models)

    Read more.... Click Here
    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #73
    "Besides enhancing the user interface, Microsoft is considering two steps aimed at making the Media Center edition of the OS more widely adopted: lowering the price it charges PC makers for the software and removing the requirement that it ship with a TV tuner, an industry source said."

    Why doesn't "it" make "ship" become "ships"? How do you know? what is the subject and verb in that sentence?

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #74
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    "...lowering the price it charges PC makers for the software and removing the requirement that it ship with a TV tuner,...."

    Why doesn't "it" make "ship" become "ships"? How do you know? what is the subject and verb in that sentence?
    Microsoft is considering removing the requirement that it ship with a TV tuner.
    The underlined portion functions as the object of the verb is considering.

    The words, 'that it ship with a TV tuner' is a relative clause (i.e., notice it begins with the relative pronoun 'that'). That clause modifies the noun 'the requirement': What kind of requirement? The requirement that it ship with a TV tuner (adjective).

    The subject of the relative clause is "it" (i.e., Microsoft the company) and the verb is 'ship':

    It (Subject) ship (Verb)

    The verb ship is in the subjunctive mood (i.e., -s is not required).

    Certain words (e.g., ask, demand, recommend, require) take a subjunctive verb if they are followed by a that-clause:

    EX: They asked that she sign the contract today.
    EX: We will demand that he take the exam in class.
    EX: I suggest that she wait until tomorrow.
    EX: The procedure requires that he not eat for 24 hours.

    Please note, that is often omitted after some verbs:

    EX: I suggest she wait until tomorrow.

    Let's compare the two sentences in question:

    Indicative Mood (Add -s)
    lowering the price that it charges (OK)

    Subjunctive Mood (Don't add -s)
    lowering the price that it charge (Not OK)
    ==> Note that, neither 'lowering' or 'the price' take subjunctive verbs.

    Subjunctive Mood (Don't add -s)
    removing the requirement that it ship (OK)
    ==> Note that, requirement is followed by a that-clause.

    Indicative Mood (Add -s)
    removing the requirement that it ships with a TV tuner. (Not OK)

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #75
    Indicative Mood (Add -s)
    lowering the price that it charges (OK)
    Why is this okay? It is followed by a "that it" clause too?

    Subjunctive Mood (Don't add -s)
    lowering the price that it charge (Not OK)
    ==> Note that, neither 'lowering' or 'the price' take subjunctive verbs.
    How do you know that it doesn't take subjunctive verbs?

    Subjunctive Mood (Don't add -s)
    removing the requirement that it ship (OK)
    ==> Note that, requirement is followed by a that-clause.

    Indicative Mood (Add -s)
    removing the requirement that it ships with a TV tuner. (Not OK)
    I still do not really understand when to add -s for these type of sentences with the word "that it" in the sentence. Can you give me some more examples of this? I am still not too sure about when is it correct and when is it incorrect. Thanks.

    "I suggest she wait until tomorrow. "
    "I suggest she waits until tomorrow. " <--is this incorrect? why?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #76
    lowering the price that it charges (OK)
    Why is this okay? It is followed by a "that it" clause too?
    It's normal. :D The indicative mood is normal: add -s to a present tense verb if the subject is 3rd person,

    Microsoft is considering lowering the price it charges.

    It's the subjunctive mood that's rare.

    Note that, neither 'lowering' or 'the price' take subjunctive verbs.
    How do you know that it doesn't take subjunctive verbs?
    In the previous post I mentioned that certain words take subjunctive verbs. They are: ask, demand, recommend, require, and a few others. Please note that, 'lowering and 'the price' are not one of those words.

    I still do not really understand when to add -s for these type of sentences with the word "that it" in the sentence.
    'that it' has nothing to do with it. Sorry for confusing you. Let me try explaining it again:

    Certain words take subjunctive verbs. They are: ask, demand, recommend, require, suggest , and a few others.

    EX: I suggest she wait until tomorrow.

    Please write a few sentences using the verbs ask, demand, recommend, require, and suggest. Once you're done, post them and we'll look at them.

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #77
    Here are my sentences. Thanks.

    I demand he need to drop the weapon.
    I demanded he need to drop the weapon. <--is this correct?
    I demanded he needs to drop the weapon. <--incorrect?

    I recommend he delay the appointment.
    I require she to do a weekly checkup.
    I suggest he go to the mall now before it closes.

    Subjunctive Mood (Don't add -s)
    removing the requirement that it ship (OK) <--I still don't really understand this.
    ==> Note that, requirement is followed by a that-clause.

    Indicative Mood (Add -s)
    lowering the price that it charges (OK) <---I still don't really understand this.

    Thanks, for helping me. :)

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #78
    Great! Let's take a look. :D

    I demand he need to drop the weapon. *two verbs
    => I demand he drop the weapon. (One verb) :D
    => I demanded he drop the weapon. (One verb) :D

    I recommend he delay the appointment. :D 8)
    I require she to do a weekly checkup. *infinitive verb
    ==> It requires she get a check-up. ('It requires')
    I suggest he go to the mall now before it closes. :D 8)

    Subjunctive Mood (Don't add -s)
    removing the requirement that it ship (OK) <--I still don't really understand this.
    ==> Note that, requirement is followed by a that-clause.
    requirement that it ship

    'require' is one of those words that takes a subjuntive verb. That's why the verb ship doesn't have -s.

    Indicative Mood (Add -s)
    lowering the price that it charges (OK) <---I still don't really understand this.
    'lowering' is not one of the words that takes a subjunctive verb. 'the price' is not one of the words that takes a subjunctive verb. The only words that take a subjunctive verb are: ask, demand, recommend, require, suggests, and a few others. If it's not one of those words, then you don't have to use the subjunctive.

    Thanks, for helping me. :)
    You are most certainly welcome. :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #79
    "He should not try this at home under any cicumstance." <--correct? what does this sentence mean?

    "He should not try this at home under any cicumstances." <--correct? what does this sentence mean?

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #80
    To me they mean:

    1. "He should not try this at home under any cicumstance." <--under any one given circumstance

    2. "He should not try this at home under any cicumstances." <--under all circumstances

    All the best, :D

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