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    #1

    Smile say in other words

    Could you, please, paraphrase the part in inverted commas:

    1. Watching from the window, Jackson "picked up" on Rigy's slight hesitation, and with it his curiosity grew even more.

    2. And nerves, or the lack thereof, realy are the whole "ball of wax".

    3. Particularly because there was "a wild card out there" he was unsure of.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: say in other words

    1. When you pick up on something you understand it. When Jackson picked up on Rigby's slight hesitation he became aware of the reason for it.

    2. The whole ball of wax is everything or everything that is important.

    3. A wild card is something that could change everything. (Thus its wildness.) The existence of a wild card introduces an element of unpredictability into the situation.

    ~R


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    #3

    Re: say in other words

    I agree, but for me the "picked up on" just suggests "noticed."

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: say in other words

    When I took a second look at this thread two things happened. 1. I noticed that you (snade17) asked for somebody to paraphrase the sentences. (Thatisn't exactly what you asked for, but it's what you are going to get.) 2. I agree with mic.

    Quote Originally Posted by snade17 View Post
    1. Watching from the window, Jackson "picked up" on Rigy's slight hesitation, and with it his curiosity grew even more.
    Watching from the window, Jackson noticed Rigy's slight hesitation, and with it his curiosity grew even more.
    Quote Originally Posted by snade17 View Post
    2. And nerves, or the lack thereof, realy are the whole "ball of wax".
    And nerves, or the lack thereof, really is the whole reason for the mistake. (I see "nerves" as singular here--meaning not more than one nerve but nervousness.
    Quote Originally Posted by snade17 View Post
    3. Particularly because there was "a wild card out there" he was unsure of.
    He was unsure of things because there was an unpredictable element out there that could change everything.
    What do you think?



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    #5

    Re: say in other words

    I think "nerves, or the lack thereof, are the whole ball of wax" is meant to say that the most important characteristic [of a person] is whether he "lacks nerves," whether he can be cool in a crisis.

    And I'd like to elaborate on "wild card"---the expression comes from card games in which the joker or other designated card can take any value the holder wants to assign to it. This increases the possibility for high-value hands and, as RonBee said, introduces an element of unpredictability.

    [native speaker & writer, not a teacher]

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: say in other words

    Quote Originally Posted by Delmobile View Post
    I think "nerves, or the lack thereof, are the whole ball of wax" is meant to say that the most important characteristic [of a person] is whether he "lacks nerves," whether he can be cool in a crisis.
    You could be right about that, but we pretty much have to guess about it since there is so little in way of context (none, really).

    ~R


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    #7

    Re: say in other words

    I think RonBee just meant that the idiomatic use of the word "nerves" in this sentence refers to the condition of nervousness, not actual neurons.

    "The disease causes deterioration of all the nerves in the body."

    but

    "You're getting on my nerves" or "You're workin' my last nerve [that's how we talk Down South :)]" - you are irritating me.

    Also, "You've got a h*ll of a nerve" or "that was pretty nervy of you" - you are brash to the point of rudeness.

    "I just haven't got the nerve to do it" - I don't dare.

    It's interesting to me that some of these expressions use the plural, some the singular.

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: say in other words

    Quote Originally Posted by Delmobile View Post
    I think RonBee just meant that the idiomatic use of the word "nerves" in this sentence refers to the condition of nervousness, not actual neurons.

    "The disease causes deterioration of all the nerves in the body."

    but

    "You're getting on my nerves" or "You're workin' my last nerve [that's how we talk Down South :)]" - you are irritating me.

    Also, "You've got a h*ll of a nerve" or "that was pretty nervy of you" - you are brash to the point of rudeness.

    "I just haven't got the nerve to do it" - I don't dare.

    It's interesting to me that some of these expressions use the plural, some the singular.
    I agree. Nevertheless, I am willing to reconsider and rephrase the sentence thusly:
    And nerves, or the lack thereof, really are the whole....
    (BTW, the expression is "the whole ball of wax", not "ball of wax".)

    (Nobody is perfect. That is why proofreaders have stet.)

    ~R

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