Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

    • Join Date: Apr 2005
    • Posts: 107
    #1

    any other help for my Q

    Hi

    Which one is correct? and why?
    For their honeymoon they went on a ...(1)... in the Greek islands. It was a very modern ...(2)....
    (1) voyage cruise travel journey
    (2) ferry tanker liner yacht

    Thanks


    • Join Date: May 2007
    • Posts: 404
    #2

    Re: any other help for my Q

    You first!

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #3

    Re: any other help for my Q

    This thread has already been answered. The question has more than one correct answer, though.


    • Join Date: Apr 2005
    • Posts: 107
    #4

    Re: any other help for my Q

    hi Barb

    Unfortunately I must say that I do not agree with you. It's reference is a certain one and there is only one answer.

    Thanks


    • Join Date: May 2007
    • Posts: 404
    #5

    Re: any other help for my Q

    I beg to differ!
    Maybe if you have a specific exercise, refered only to some partition.
    But, being given only this sentence, I assure you more than one thing can be fitted(e.g. 2. liner, yacht).

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #6

    Re: any other help for my Q

    Exactly, Jason - I would say that either yacht or liner would work equally well with cruise.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #7

    Re: any other help for my Q

    mir12480, I'll politely disagree with the replies, and amicably agree with you. There is only one set answer here:
    Ex: For their honeymoon they went on a (1) cruise in the Greek islands. It was a very modern (ocean) (2) liner.
    The sentence is testing referencing. The pronoun It refers back to the concept expressed by the noun in (1). That is, a cruise involves a cruise ship; synonym (cruise) liner.
    ...and it (the ship they took)was a very modern (cruise) liner.
    ...and it (the voyage/journey they took) was a very modern liner.
    ...and it (the voyage/journey they took) was a very modern yatch.
    Cruise ship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #8

    Re: any other help for my Q

    mir12480, it is OK to post the same question twice, and if you choose to do so, you'll need to state why you are reposting the same question. Be kind to your audience. Let them know the reasons why the replies you received are unacceptable. Otherwise, they might assume that your question was sufficiently answered.

    All the best

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #9

    Re: any other help for my Q

    Hi Cas,
    I don't really understand the distinction you're making. Some people take cruises on those huge, floating cities called cruise ships or cruise liners, but some peope take them on more intimate boats. (Either way, I want to go too!)

    Why can't it be read as "and it (the ship they took) was a very modern (cruising) yacht"?

    I don't think native speakers would make this distinction. (At least, I didn't.)


    (Not trying to be argumentative, really - I just don't see the difference.)

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #10

    Re: any other help for my Q

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Hi Cas,
    I don't really understand the distinction you're making. Some people take cruises on those huge, floating cities called cruise ships or cruise liners, but some peope take them on more intimate boats.
    A yatch is indeed a cruising vessel, and you can indeed take a cruise on a yacht, but people generally take a cruise on a cruise liner.

    The coupling a cruise = a cruise liner is an unmarked semantic association, whereas a cruise = a yatch is a semantically marked one. It requires additional modification, notably the word yacht:

    Semantically marked
    They went on a cruise in the Greek islands on their yacht.

    Semantically unmarked
    They went on a cruise in the Greek islands (i.e., on a cruise liner).


    Left unmarked, the noun phrase a cruise refers to a cruise liner; marked it and it refers to something else.

    In sum, of the two possibilities (2) yatch and (2) liner, the latter is the best answer because the association a cruise = a cruise liner is unmarked semantically.

    Does that help?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •