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    #1

    Ambiguities in "Apart from"

    Some teachers said that "apart from" means "excluding the things/persons that follow", and cannot be used as an equivalent to "as well as".
    On the other hand, some authoritative dictionaries, like the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, say otherwise as follows:

    1
    except for
    We didn't see anyone all day, apart from a couple of kids on the beach.
    Apart from the ending, it's a really good film.

    2
    as well as
    Apart from his earnings as a football coach, he also owns and runs a chain of sports shops.
    Quite apart from the cost, we need to think about how much time the job will take.

    "Other than" also has the same problem.
    Some say: "other than" = as well as
    the others say:
    "other than" = except, excluding
    Worst still, some say it can only be used in negative statements, but some use it in postive. Alas, please help me out of the hell.

    Any advice, sirs.

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    #2

    Re: Ambiguities in "Apart from"

    I agree with the dictionary- it's a sort of contranym phrase. However, it's not as simple as 'as well as' to me. take your second example; while it recognises the importance of the cost, it now moves on to the time factor, so it does in a sense exclude further discussion of the money.

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    #3

    Re: Ambiguities in "Apart from"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I agree with the dictionary- it's a sort of contranym phrase. However, it's not as simple as 'as well as' to me. take your second example; while it recognises the importance of the cost, it now moves on to the time factor, so it does in a sense exclude further discussion of the money.
    What is the conclusion? Do you mean "Apart from" can be used for both, "except" and "as well as"?

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