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  1. blouen's Avatar
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    #1

    thou sayest it.

    Art thou the King of the Jews? And he answering said unto him, Thou sayest it.


    *** "Thou sayest it" is what in contemporary English?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: thou sayest it.

    Well... technically, it's "you say it." But there's more meaning here that than. In church, I've heard it more like:

    Are you you the King of the Jews?
    I have never made that claim myself, but you that I am, so there is no point in my denying it.

  3. blouen's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: thou sayest it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Well... technically, it's "you say it." But there's more meaning here that than. In church, I've heard it more like:

    Are you you the King of the Jews?
    I have never made that claim myself, but you that I am, so there is no point in my denying it.
    It's like : "You said it right." right?


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    #4

    Re: thou sayest it.

    Very colloquially, yes.

    Jesus is avoiding making the statement about himself, a crime in Roman eyes at that time. However, he is also not denying the truth of the statement.

  4. blouen's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: thou sayest it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Very colloquially, yes.

    Jesus is avoiding making the statement about himself, a crime in Roman eyes at that time. However, he is also not denying the truth of the statement.
    How is it a crime?


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    #6

    Re: thou sayest it.

    Sorry, I wasn't very clear - the crime was to declare someone as being the king of the Jews. The Romans had very strong views on who was in charge.


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    #7

    Re: thou sayest it.

    I am not an English teacher, but I do have a degree in Koine Greek, from which the phrase, "Thou sayest it" comes from.

    Jesus was very clearly answering Pilate's question with a "yes". "Thou sayest it," is a Greek idiomatic expression to affirm "yes" to the question that a person was asking.

    This idiom is used throughout the Gospels in Jesus' response to questions regarding Who He was. You can see this clearly just a few verses earlier in Luke 22:70-71 when Jesus is asked, "Art Thou then the Son of God? And He said unto them, Ye say that I am. And they said, what need we any further witness? For we ourselves have heard of his own mouth."

    We use this type of idomatic expression to some degree in English. For example, if I am hungry, and someone asks me, "Are you hungry?", if I reply by saying, "You've said it" or, "You're telling me," my response it ulitmately "yes."

    Hope that helps.

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