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  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    How about this question.

    I was panicked or I was panicky ?

    Which one should be the right usage or both them can work out?
    The person's state of mind is possibly the same, but one is a verb ("panicked") and the other is an adjective ("panicky'). "I was panicked" indicates what the person did. "I was panicky" indicates the person's state of mind. Do you have a context for that?

    :)

  2. eric2004
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    #12
    :D Thanks a zillion, dear Ron.
    Hmm, all of questions here are from lines in Friends.
    Next time I'll put more context for you when I get new problems.

  3. eric2004
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    #13
    New question.

    "you'd be starin' at the business end of a hissy fit. "

    I was completely stuck in understanding this sentence. Please give me a hand, dear teachers.

  4. eric2004
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    #14
    "It's like the pot calling the kettle black"


    same as " It takes one to know one"?????

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #15
    It's a bit similar, but we use the 'pot caling the kettle black' when someone accuses a person of something, though they are guilty of worse. You'd say it when a notoriously dishonest politican, say, accused a colleague of lying.

  6. RonBee's Avatar
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    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    New question.

    "you'd be starin' at the business end of a hissy fit. "

    I was completely stuck in understanding this sentence. Please give me a hand, dear teachers.
    The phrase "business end" is used in a few phrases. It always indicates the part if something that gives a person trouble. For example, the "business end" of a baseball bat can hurt you.

    :)

  7. RonBee's Avatar
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    :D Thanks a zillion, dear Ron.
    Hmm, all of questions here are from lines in Friends.
    Next time I'll put more context for you when I get new problems.
    Context is always important. The reason I asked you that question is that I can always explain the meaning of a sentence better if I understand its context.

    :)

  8. eric2004
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    #18
    "You two are totally into each other"

    One girl said it to another gilr when this another girl had met a fansinating guy a while before.

    What does it exactly mean?

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #19
    They are fascinated and involved with one another.

  10. eric2004
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    #20
    Thanks, new one.

    "If you need something to hold you over, I'll get you a job right here."

    What means "hold you over'?

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