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  1. eric2004
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    #21
    "I may be way out on a limb here, but do you have a problem with Janice?"


    In this sentence, what means " be way out on a limb"?

  2. eric2004
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    #22
    What means "It's about time."?

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #23
    It's about time = it is nearly time for something or something should already have happened, be happening.

    It's about time for the TV programme (give or take a few minutes)
    It's about time she understood her responsibilities. (she should but doesn't)

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    "I may be way out on a limb here, but do you have a problem with Janice?"


    In this sentence, what means " be way out on a limb"?
    "Way out on a limb" can mean to take a risk (as if one were climbing a tree and moving toward branches that will not support one's weight). In this case, it means to be in a position that others would not put themselves in, to invite criticism for making a foolish statement. :wink:

  5. eric2004
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    #25
    Many thanks, teacher Tdol and Mike. You're great. :wink: (kinda for brown-nosing)

    But , two teachers, you missed a question of mine which located in the end of page 1. Please tell me what it was supposed to mean?


    "If you need something to hold you over, I'll get you a job right here."

    What means "hold you over'?

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #26
    To keep you going for a short time- a temporary job.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    Many thanks, teacher Tdol and Mike. You're great. :wink: (kinda for brown-nosing)

    But , two teachers, you missed a question of mine which located in the end of page 1. Please tell me what it was supposed to mean?


    "If you need something to hold you over, I'll get you a job right here."

    What means "hold you over'?
    The "hold you over" refers to money or the means to earn it. :wink:

  8. eric2004
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    #28
    Thanks again. New question here.

    What means "Bite me!" and " climb out of my butt."?

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    Thanks again. New question here.

    What means "Bite me!" and " climb out of my butt."?
    Both are expressions of irritation. "Bite me" is just a hair less vulgar than "F*ck you". Climb out of my butt implies that the person has been up your butt -- being very demanding and pushy. :wink:

  10. RonBee's Avatar
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    "I may be way out on a limb here, but do you have a problem with Janice?"


    In this sentence, what means " be way out on a limb"?
    In addition to what Mike said, the person is taking a chance because he is not totally sure his assumptions are correct.

    Where do you find these things?

    :wink:

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