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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    came along

    Tom's health came along for a while, then again it started deteriorating.

    Is this sentene correct? [I mean the `came along' as `improved']

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: came along

    No. Say:
    Tom's health got better for a while, then it deteriorated.

    Or:

    Tom's health got better for a while, then it worsened.
    ~R

  2. bianca's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: came along

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    Tom's health came along for a while, then again it started deteriorating.

    Is this sentene correct? [I mean the `came along' as `improved']
    Maybe you thought of saying:

    Tom's health came along fine (for a while), before it started deteriorating again.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #4

    Re: came along

    My English is coming along.
    Her health is coming along quite nicely, and I think she will be cured soon.
    My father's attitude towards me has came along after my teacher advised him.

    Are all these sentences grammatically and semantically correct?
    I hope so. Please help me.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: came along

    1. It definitely works well with "My English."
    3. His attitude "has come a long way since" (it's improved).

    2. Perhaps because I'm American, but "his health is coming along" just doesn't sound right to me.

    If someone has injured his shoulder and it's getting better, I can imagine hearing "Oh, it's coming along, thanks" when asked about the shoulder. Or a knee. Or even "a recovery" in general, but not "health."

    Is "his health is coming along" idiomatic in other dialects? Or would you rephrase as "His recovery..."? (Or is it just me, and other Americans find it okay as-is?)

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: came along

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    My English is coming along.
    Her health is coming along quite nicely, and I think she will be cured soon.
    My father's attitude towards me has came along after my teacher advised him.
    I don't like any of those. (But maybe it's just me.)

    For the first sentence, try:
    My English is coming along quite nicely. I am learning more every day.
    For the second sentence, try:
    Her health is improving, and I think she will be completely cured soon.
    For the third sentence, try:
    My father's attitude toward me has changed for the better since my teacher talked to him.
    (See my first posting.)

    ~R


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #7

    Re: came along

    Thank you friends.
    Again few trials :
    Her attitude is really coming along nicely with other teachers and students and so, I think soon, she will be appointed as the principal of the school.

    Last month I got shoulder injury. It has been coming along nicely and soon it will heal.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #8

    Re: came along

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    Thank you friends.
    Again few trials :
    Her attitude is really coming along nicely with other teachers and students and so, I think soon, she will be appointed as the principal of the school. This sentence is not right. It is semantically incorrect. "Her attitude is coming along nicely" is quite meaningless.

    Her application for the job as Principal is coming along nicely, and so I think she will soon be appointed.

    Last month I got a shoulder injury. It has been coming along nicely and soon it will heal. This is ok.
    ..

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