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    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 7
    #1

    grammatical question

    Hi, teachers.

    I have a question regarding technical expressions.

    When friction is generated between A and B (A and B being material objects), can I say/write; "A and B are frictioned against (with/to?) each other"?

    Can the word "friction" be used as a verb as well?

    Looking forward to your answers:)

  1. blouen's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 3,340
    #2

    Re: grammatical question

    Quote Originally Posted by white little bird View Post
    Hi, teachers.

    I have a question regarding technical expressions.

    When friction is generated between A and B (A and B being material objects), can I say/write; "A and B are frictioned against (with/to?) each other"?

    Can the word "friction" be used as a verb as well?

    Looking forward to your answers:)
    What I learned in school is that friction is produced when rubbing two surfaces together, so it is a noun... The action is the rubbing together of A and B.... rubbing is the verb...

    ************************************************** ****
    {just a learner as you are}


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 77
    #3

    Re: grammatical question

    Quote Originally Posted by white little bird View Post
    Hi, teachers.

    I have a question regarding technical expressions.

    When friction is generated between A and B (A and B being material objects), can I say/write; "A and B are frictioned against (with/to?) each other"?

    Can the word "friction" be used as a verb as well?

    Looking forward to your answers:)
    I'm not a teacher, but I wouldn't use the word "friction" as a verb at all; it just doesn't sound right.

    Instead, I would probably reword the example sentence to, "When A and B are rubbed against each other, friction is produced."

    "To rub" is a verb that can easily take the preposition "against," although it does not take "with" or "to."

    Two objects can also be rubbed "together," so the example sentence could also be revised to read, "When A and B are rubbed together, friction is produced." If you want to use fewer words, this would probably be the way to go, but either revision would work just fine.

    (BTW, if you don't already know, "little white bird" is the usual order in English...)


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 7
    #4

    Re: grammatical question

    Thanks a lot, blouen and JLP

    >JLP
    I chose my user name from a title of my favorite book, which I vaguely remembered*lol* (and yes, the correct title is "the little white bird", now I won't forget that )

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