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    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 14
    #1

    Xeraph

    Hi there,

    not being a native English speaker, sometimes I have problems in understanding the right meaning of some sentences.
    Now I am reading a book in which I hit upon a phrase that, I think, sounds very strange. It runs:

    "There was a dejection in the air that dragged like an old skirt in the gutter."

    Generally, I understand the words afore-mentioned describe an unpleasant weather conditions; but what about the odd likening "an old skirt in the gutter?" Am I supposed to imagine some old and unused rag dragging in a ditch or mud or something like this?

    Thanks for any suggestion

    Xeraph, Czech rep.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: Xeraph

    Welcome to the forums, Xeraph!

    "There was a dejection in the air that dragged like an old skirt in the gutter."

    This sentence is describing a sense of heaviness and depression, characterising it with the simile of the skirt being dragged in the gutter. It has nothing to do with weather conditions, but with emotion.


    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 14
    #3

    Re: Xeraph

    Thanks a lot for Your reply, Anglika. I thought the sentence refered to a weather condition because of its beginning with "Yesterday had been summer in the city, the end of summer jaded and stale, with dejection in the air that dragged like an old skirt in the gutter."

    Now I understand more clearly.

    Once more thank You very much.

    Xeraph


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: Xeraph

    You're welcome.

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