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    #1

    As

    I've heard that, "as" and "than" is used in a various way
    Ex:
    She was very religious, as were most of her friends


    Lilia is as beautiful as Karen

    Nobody in this class studies as well as David does

    So, could you tell me how to use in each way? When to inverse it and when should not?

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    #2

    Re: As

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    I've heard that, "as" and "than" is used in a various way
    Ex:
    She was very religious, as were most of her friends
    You invert in cases like this, where there is no comparison. The "as" is just a conjunction. The sentence is a short way of saying "She was very religious, and most of her friends were religious too."

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Lilia is as beautiful as Karen

    Nobody in this class studies as well as David does

    So, could you tell me how to use in each way? When to inverse it and when should not?
    In these two cases there is a comparison: "A + verb + as + adj or adv + as B"; examples -

    Your two (as above). Also...

    John is as ambitious as Kevin. (comparing the adjective "ambitious")

    Katy eats as slowly as Anne. (comparing the adverb "eats")
    Sorry I can't point you to any other site; I'm off on holiday for a week.

    b

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    #3

    Re: As

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    You invert in cases like this, where there is no comparison. The "as" is just a conjunction. The sentence is a short way of saying "She was very religious, and most of her friends were religious too."



    In these two cases there is a comparison: "A + verb + as + adj or adv + as B"; examples -

    Your two (as above). Also...

    John is as ambitious as Kevin. (comparing the adjective "ambitious")

    Katy eats as slowly as Anne. (comparing the adverb "eats")
    Sorry I can't point you to any other site; I'm off on holiday for a week.

    b
    Hi Bob.

    Sorry, but I have to make a slight correction , if you don`t mind :"eats" is a verb here. I`m sure you made it by mistake, thinking of "slowly" .



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    #4

    Re: As

    Can I say:
    Lilia is beautiful, as is Karen
    and is it different from
    Lilia is as beautiful as Karen?


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    #5

    Re: As

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Can I say:
    Lilia is beautiful, as is Karen
    and is it different from
    Lilia is as beautiful as Karen?
    "Lilia is beautiful, as is Karen" is correct, and the emphasis is on the fact that both women are beautiful.

    "Lilia is as beautiful as Karen," is also correct, but the emphasis is on the fact that both women are equally beautiful, not simply that they are both beautiful.

    [Not a teacher]

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    #6

    Re: As

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi Bob.

    Sorry, but I have to make a slight correction , if you don`t mind :"eats" is a verb here. I`m sure you made it by mistake, thinking of "slowly" .

    As a criminal caught in the act might say, 'It's a fair cop'!

    b

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    #7

    Re: As

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    As a criminal caught in the act might say, 'It's a fair cop'!

    b
    Hi Bob

    What is the meaning of "It`s a fair cop" in this context? I mean, what did you mean by using this phrase here?
    I`m looking forward to seeing your answer!

    Thank you.

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    #8

    Re: As

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi Bob

    What is the meaning of "It`s a fair cop" in this context? I mean, what did you mean by using this phrase here?
    I`m looking forward to seeing your answer!

    Thank you.
    'Cop' is an informal way of saying (among many other things) 'arrest' - so a wrong-doer caught in the act would say to a policeman 'It's a fair cop' meaning 'I was breaking the law and you have caught me - I admit it'.



    b

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    #9

    Re: As

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'Cop' is an informal way of saying (among many other things) 'arrest' - so a wrong-doer caught in the act would say to a policeman 'It's a fair cop' meaning 'I was breaking the law and you have caught me - I admit it'.



    b
    Thank you for your answer. Very interesting!

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