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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    taken to drinking

    I have taken to drinking wine very late.

    [I have written this sentence to mean, "I have started to drink wine recently".

    Please help me.


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    #2

    Re: taken to drinking

    "very late" means late in the day.

    Recently I have taken to drinking wine.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: taken to drinking

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    I have taken to drinking wine very late.

    [I have written this sentence to mean, "I have started to drink wine recently".
    I believe the sentence means I have started drinking wine recently.

    ~R


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    #4

    Re: taken to drinking

    Thank you friends.

    I wrote the above sentence, after I looked through this sentence in a dictionary :
    He's taken to staying out very late..
    I thought, here, very late = recently, to mean, "He has started staying out recently(not in home but out)"

    Please help me on this.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: taken to drinking

    Suggestions/corrections (in blue)

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post

    I wrote the above sentence, after I looked through this sentence in a dictionary :
    He's taken to staying out very late..
    I thought, here, very late = recently, to mean, "He has started staying out recently(not in home but out)"

    I wrote the sentence above after I saw this sentence in a dictionary:
    He's taken to staying out very late.
    I took "very late" to mean "recently", thus the sentence would mean: "He has been staying out recently."
    The word late does not mean recently. Instead, late means (here) after hours or when most people are in bed or getting ready to go to bed. (Perhaps you were thinking of lately, which is a synonym for recently.)


    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    Please help me on this.
    Please help me with this.
    OK

    .


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    #6

    Re: taken to drinking

    Thank you Anglika and Ronbee.
    I have got it.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: taken to drinking

    P.S.
    You can look through a dictionary, but you can't look through a sentence. You can see a sentence, read a sentence, or run across a sentence.
    ~R


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    #8

    Re: taken to drinking

    Thank you Ronbee.

    From a dictionary, look through = to read somethiong quickly

    I have also heard "looked through the sentence/notice board/the paragraph" more often. I haven't heard this phrase with dictionary once.

    I know, I must be wrong. But would you justify your point?

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    #9

    Re: taken to drinking

    You would look through a longer text than a single sentence normally- look through a magazine, an article, etc.

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: taken to drinking

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    You would look through a longer text than a single sentence normally- look through a magazine, an article, etc.
    Yep. That's it! To look through something is to take a longer look than for reading a sentence.

    Are we happy now?


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