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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    why using prepositon "to" instead of "of"

    Hey guys, my first post here,

    I have a question over the following sentence,

    "There seems to be an added side-effect to mitigation by this software"

    Could someone here explain a little why here the author uses to, not of?

    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: why using prepositon "to" instead of "of"

    You've certainly picked a tricky one for your first post, Fedora. This is computer-jargon English and I'm not sure what the author is trying to say.

    1. If the mitigation is a side effect of the software, then the preposition should be of.

    2.If the mitigation is the cause of a side-effect, then the preposition should be to.

    Since I don't know what mitigation means in this context, I have to believe he meant meaning #2 above.

  2. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: why using prepositon "to" instead of "of"

    Thanks mykwyner!

    Yes, the mitigation is the cause of a side-effect, so can I use "from" here?

    man, preposition is very hard to me!

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    1. If the mitigation is a side effect of the software, then the preposition should be of.

    2.If the mitigation is the cause of a side-effect, then the preposition should be to.
    "There seems to be an added side-effect to mitigation by this software"

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    #4

    Re: why using prepositon "to" instead of "of"

    Yes, if the mitigation is the cause of the side-effect, then from would be the better preposition.

  3. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: why using prepositon "to" instead of "of"

    okay, thank you mykwyner!

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    #6

    Re: why using prepositon "to" instead of "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Beag View Post
    Side-effect of is more common than side-effect from, so I'd choose of if I had to take one of the two.

    BUT:

    Why did the author use to?

    Here's two examples: (taken from real language)
    There aren’t six women to every man. (in Iceland)
    There are two sides to every story.

    I don't know how to describe what to means in this context, but it describes some sort of relationship and it is perfectly correct in the original sentence.
    I think to here is idiomatic like allergic to. Married to for instance doesn't sound logical in many languages. Married with four children makes it even more confusing. Another one is born to.

  4. bianca's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: why using prepositon "to" instead of "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    Yes, if the mitigation is the cause of the side-effect, then from would be the better preposition.
    Mitigation to / from reminds me of different to / from. Why 'to' and not 'from'?? Because language doesn't make logical associations! You can see some explanatios here:

    Modern English Usage, third edition, says "The commonly expressed view that different should only be followed by from and never by to or than is not supportable in the face of past and present evidence or of logic". After a run through the (long) history of the phrase, it concludes "The principle upon which different to is questioned is based on the premiss that we do not say differ to. By this argument, all words in the same morphological family should be construed with the same prepositions; e.g. we ought to say according with (instead of according to) because we say accords with. Contrast also full of with filled with; proud of with pride in."

    Incorrect Corrections in English
    Last edited by bianca; 08-Aug-2007 at 11:16.

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