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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #1

    take in

    During his childhood, his mother had died. Then onwards I have been taking her in my house.
    I don't know how he took in Tomi that still he isn't married.
    I have to taken in this pant at the thigh.



    Are my sentences correct?

    Please help me.

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    #2

    Re: take in

    During his childhood, his mother had died. Then onwards I have been taking her in my house. His mother died when he was still a child. He has been living with me since.

    I don't know how he took in Tomi that still he isn't married. Does ‘took in’ here mean ‘understood’ or ‘received’? You mean "I don’t know he understood Tomi that he’s still not married."

    I have to taken in this pant at the thigh. You can’t have a past participle after the infinitive ‘to’? I've trouble understanding this. Please explain the intended meaning of this sentence.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #3

    Re: take in

    The final sentence means he has to alter his trousers: I have to take in these pants at the thigh.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #4

    Re: take in

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    The final sentence means he has to alter his trousers: I have to take in these pants at the thigh.
    Thank you Anglika and Buddhaheart. That was a typo to write "taken".

    Let see these meanings from the dictionary :
    take sb in (CARE FOR) phrasal verb
    to take care of someone and provide a place in your home for them:

    take sb in (DECEIVE) phrasal verb to cause someone to believe something which is not true, or to trick or deceive someone:

    Now, do you think my first two sentences are correct? Or still it is incorrect?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #5

    Re: take in

    During his childhood, his mother had died. Then onwards I have been taking her in my house.
    You are still confusing us with your pronouns. You have "he" in the first sentence, and "her" in the second. Who is the "her" in the second?

    He > him [male]
    She > her [female]

    You would usually say "I took [him/her] into my home." OR "I took in [him/her]" - you do not need to qualify "took in" in this context. It will be understood that you provided him/her with somewhere to like.
    I don't know how he took in Tomi that still he isn't married.

    Not a good phrasing.

    I don't know how Tomi was taken in about him.
    Tomi was taken in by him because she thought he was not married.
    He fooled Tomi into thinking he wasn't married


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
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    #6

    Re: take in

    Thank you Anglika.
    Sorry ! again it's a typo.

    The one I meant was, "During his childhood, his mother had died. Then onwards I have been taking him in my house."

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: take in

    Gary, please read the OTHER things that people say too.

    During childhood, his mother died, so I took him in.

    Once you take someone in, they are in. You don't keep "taking him in."

    You don't need to say "my house." It's implied.

    Note that this is rather old-fashioned phrasing. It is quite rate to hear of a person in modern American "taking in" someone. You say "I let her come live with us for a bit," or "She went to live with her aunt."

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