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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 1,740
    #1

    comma problem

    I wanted to live in a foreign country, so I applied for a job in Japan.

    I know we put comma before "co-ordinating conjunction" like and, but, etc.

    I can't understand why the above sentence has been put comma in front of "so".

    Could you help me with this?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: comma problem

    FANBOYS is an acronym for the conjunctions:

    for
    and
    nor
    but
    or
    yet
    so


    Conjunctions


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 556
    #3

    Re: comma problem

    Casiopea, is this another case when what I was taught thirty years ago (okay, thirty-five years) is obsolete? I seem to remember learning "and, but & or" as the only examples of coordinating conjunctions. These three are also memorialized in "Conjunction Junction."

    [not a teacher, but trying to at least keep up]


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 1,740
    #4

    Re: comma problem

    Thank you friends.
    Here is one more doubt :
    I know we omit comma after the words like now, then, here etc. though they modify the whole sentence.

    e.g. Now I can complete the work.

    Here I think that the "now" needs comma because it modifies the whole sentence, but still comma is omitted.
    Could you tell me why we omit comma here?
    Last edited by user_gary; 10-Aug-2007 at 18:24.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
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    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #5

    Re: comma problem

    Many writers will omit the comma after extremely short introductory phrases like that.

    Now we can begin.
    Then I went to the store.

    Many writers will also omit the comma before "too" or "also" if they appear at the very end of the sentence.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #6

    Re: comma problem

    Delmobile, conjunction in the sense that if you omitted one of the FANBOYS, the clauses on either end could stand alone. For example,

    I wanted to live in a foreign country.

    SO

    I applied for a job in Japan.

    Each word has a form (what it looks like) and function (what it does in the sentence). Our so is a conjunction in form; it joins two independent clauses. It's also an adverb in function; it tells us why so-and-so applied for a job in Japan. Some people might call it a subordinating conjunctions (See here, http://grammar.uoregon.edu/conjuncti...dinating.html), but of course they mean so that, not so.

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