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  1. beascarpetta's Avatar
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    #21

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I think we should get into that. I was not fond of high school Latin until I got into college. Then, the value was revealed to me - law, medicine, English, vocabulary, etc. I would support compulsory Latin for anyone interested in academics.
    I really salute that.

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    #22

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    Quote Originally Posted by beascarpetta View Post
    would you rather have examples taken from prose authors or poets (where there might be ambiguous undertones concerning the meaning of the word "status" such as in Plautus,slightly ironic even) and which era would you be most interested in?


    That was remarkably speedy, Bea. It took me five minutes to find my meagre one, and you've brought up a netful.

    I'll take whatever you've got.

    All the best,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

  3. beascarpetta's Avatar
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    #23

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    would the quotes such as I posted on page 2 be alright or would you need more information

    as to which book,verse,etc they are taken from?

    glad to be of help.so nice to find people who still know Latin.


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    #24

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    Please excuse me for saying the following but I believe it is important that this is known.

    I am a man with American nationality but was raised in England and although I love America in many ways there is, among the few things I dislike, the fact that some Americans seem to forget where their language comes from. This is quite displeasing because language is one of the key aspects of culture and for those who don't know where the language spoken in America (other than Spanish) comes from... it comes from England.

    The word STATUS, in plural, is STATUS, although derived from Latin, where words as such, in the plural form, end in "i".

    Please repeat the word STATUSES in your mind or in a full sentence out loud and tell me that it is not one bloody mouthful of a word to pronounce and that, even if one could be bothered to pronounces such a word, it just does not sound right! English is a beautiful language derived, throughout history, from many languages such as Latin, French and Germanic languages as well as Celtic and Viking languages. I am, however,very much for the change and evolution of spoken communication but I believe that there would be better ways of creating a plural form of words, as such, without always adding "es" at the end, especially if it makes the word ugly and difficult to pronounce. Now... knowing that America is, at the moment, a leading world power, we all know the people who inhabit this land can do what they would like with their language, but this website is called "UsingEnglish.com" and I think that we should stick to talking about the true English language. That being said, I do still enjoy American slang as well as their odd expressions and the new words the invent to precisely define the sub-category of an existing noun, such as "cookie".


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    #25

    Unhappy Re: Plural of the word "status"

    All good points, especially about the pronunciation, but whether to allow "clever" into the dictionary just after Shakespear's time or to allow statuses is by popular, majority rule, so Americans have so voted:
    status - Wiktionary


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    #26

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    I have another question relating to this subject---assuming you use the word status-which is correct??- The status of the expenses is or are as follows. Some grammar checks say it's appropriate to use is and some say are.

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    #27

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    "Status" may be the Latin fourth-declension plural of "status", but the English plural is "statuses". If it exists at all, that is: status is something of an abstract noun. Perhaps that's why "statuses" seems odd.

    To answer your question: paraphrase!

    The expenses [each] show the following status: ...
    Last edited by abaka; 02-Feb-2009 at 18:02.


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    #28

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    I came to this forum after typing 'statuses' into google - this word is used in a textbook I'm reading, 'Jurisprudence & Legal Theory: Commentary and Materials' (p194) - Authors: Penner et al.
    I had not understood the word - not realising that it was a plural of status.


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    #29

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    My twopennyworth: I'd like to suggest that the word status is reserved for where we mean a quality that can be attributed to either one or many. As in: "members of the royal family have status" and the "Prince of Wales has status". You would talk about different degrees of status. I'd like to think that the word status does not have a plural. The temptation to pluralize would indicate that another word is probably better. e.g. water can exist in one state or another - 3 states: ice, water or steam. i.e state, not status ... and, in the example above, not a plurality of status but a plurality of degrees of status. I imagine that literate Romans would have reserved the 4th declension for nouns of this sort - abstract, qualitative and not amenable to being pluralized.


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    #30

    Re: Plural of the word "status"

    No, no, no.
    "status of the expenses" - the word "expenses" is the predicate nominative of "status." It is not the subject of the sentence.
    The word "status" is the subject of the sentence. Therefore, the verb to use is "is." As in, the "status ... is".

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