Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Unregistered
    Guest
    #1

    Smile Does it take

    Hi, I'm an English student from Brazil. I'd like to know if I can replace "It takes him two minutes to eat an ice cream." for "He takes two minutes to eat an ice cream." Do these sentences mean the same thing? Are they both grammatically correct?

    Thanks.

    Lud

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: Does it take

    Example 1a. is a variation of 1b., and both of those examples mean the same thing as example 2.:

    1a. It takes him two minutes to eat an ice cream.
    1b. Eating ice cream takes him two minutes.

    2. He takes two minutes to eat an ice cream.

    Does that help?

  3. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 1
    #3

    Smile Re: Does it take

    Thank you very much for aswering so fast and giving me a clear explanation. It really helped me a lot. I was browsing through this web site and I came to the conclusion that it's fab! So I've decided to become a member. Congratulations on this excellent job!


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #4

    Re: Does it take

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Hi, I'm an English student from Brazil. I'd like to know if I can replace "It takes him two minutes to eat an ice cream." for "He takes two minutes to eat an ice cream." Do these sentences mean the same thing? Are they both grammatically correct?

    Thanks.

    Lud

    Hi Lud,

    I'm not completely sure that your two sentences, above, are identical in meaning, or maybe I should say in nuance or usage. For time notions we do use "it takes ..." but changing to a pronoun, he/she/they/you seems to shift the meaning/nuance to more of a habitual, routine event.

    'ice cream' is normally an uncountable so it doesn't take 'an' although in casual spoken English uncountables are often shortened, for example,

    a bottle of beer -> a beer

    a glass of whisky -> a whisky

    This is done most often when the counter item, bottle/glass/etc is known to the parties involved.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2005
    • Posts: 1,198
    #5

    Re: Does it take

    1. Yes, I agree with you Riverkid there is a shift but not only in meaning. The focus is also shifted.
    2. He takes two minutes to eat an ice-cream
    can also mean: he takes two minutes out of a specific period of time available at our disposal.

    2. The quantity whether a glass, a bottle, a cup is implied and understood.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •