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    #1

    Question emolliate

    Please, in which situation can I use the verb to emolliate?
    Some dictionaries don't even have this entry.
    Last edited by Daniele Menezes; 23-Aug-2007 at 17:17.

  1. #2

    Re: emolliate

    "Emmoliate" apparently means "to moisturize". It also seems to be a technical term used mainly in the cosmetics industry ("be sure to properly emolliate after a sun-tan"). It seems to have the exact same meaning as "moisturize"(the skin) but I'm sure many "professionals" think "emmoliate" makes them sound smarter.

    I think that you would do well to note that many dictionaries don't have this term, and avoid it in favour of "moisturize". Unless of course, you work in cosmetics in which case you can have fun explaining this to everyone curious.

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    #3

    Re: emolliate

    Thank you, dear. But I meant the verb to EMOLLIATE. Pay attention to its spelling.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: emolliate

    I have never seen this word before.

    All the online dictionaries I checked all used the same sentence: Emolliated by four centuries of Roman domination, the Belgic colonies had forgotten their pristine valor. --Pinkerton.

    If you use it, most people will have no idea what you mean.

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    #5

    Re: emolliate

    Thank you for your attention!
    I won't dare use it.
    Hugs, Daniele.

  3. #6

    Re: emolliate

    Well, apologies for that. Those same dictionaries list the definition as
    "to soften or make effeminate".
    Here, we can see the possible etymological relation to emmoliate (perhaps even, I daresay, a misspelling of the same word).

    Of course I see that you have already settled on possibly the wisest choice, just avoid the word.

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