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  1. #1

    if you're a mind to go along

    What does if you're a mind to go along mean in the excerpt below?


    After a while Mr. Royall pushed back his chair. "Now, then," he said,
    "if you're a mind to go along----" She did not move, and he continued:
    "We can pick up the noon train for Nettleton if you say so."
    (Edith Wharton - Summer)

    .


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    #2

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Colloquial; I think there may also be a type : "If you've a mind"

    It means "If you want to go/come", or perhaps more tentatively, "If you think you might like to go/come".

  2. #3

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Colloquial; I think there may also be a type : "If you've a mind"

    It means "If you want to go/come", or perhaps more tentatively, "If you think you might like to go/come".

    Yes, that's it. He wants her to come, but doesn't want to push her to hard. Thanks!

    .

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Colloquial; I think there may also be a type : "If you've a mind"

    It means "If you want to go/come", or perhaps more tentatively, "If you think you might like to go/come".
    Is this a meta-typo?

    b


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    #5

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Deedy deedy - shows how important it is to read your own work!

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    #6

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Quote Originally Posted by Caorthine View Post
    Yes, that's it. He wants her to come, but doesn't want to push her to hard. Thanks!

    .
    Do you know what you left out of that sentence?


    (Meta-typo--love it! That might not have been a word before, but it is now.)

  5. #7

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Oh, my God, I just realised how this could be interpreted . Well, all I can say is that I didn't mean it like that ... sorry!

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    #8

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    I guess I could have just said it should be too hard.


  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Quote Originally Posted by Caorthine View Post
    What does if you're a mind to go along mean ...
    As Anglika said, it's "you've a mind...". You may also be interested to know that there's a fairly rare expression, to refer to a possible tendency in favour of something: 'I'm minded to take pity on you, but I have not decided yet.' (This as I said, is rarely used - but occurs sometimes in judicial language.)

    b

  8. #10

    Re: if you're a mind to go along

    Thanks everyone, but I have a question. When you're talking about a typo, do you mean that it's my typo or Project Gutenberg's? That's where I got the text from, and it clearly says:

    "Ain't you ashamed to talk that way to a lady that's got to earn her
    living, when you go about with jewellery like that on you?... It ain't
    in my line, and I do it only as a favour... but if you're a mind to leave
    that brooch as a pledge, I don't say no.... Yes, of course, you can get
    it back when you bring me my money...."

    Maybe someone has access to a printed version of the novel?

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