Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #1

    to ride (on a) horse

    Is it correct when I say e.g. "He rides on a horse." or "He's riding to the forest on his horse."? I guess the first example is incorrect, isn't it?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,216
    #2

    Re: to ride (on a) horse

    Usually, I would say simply "He is riding a horse."

    I wouldn't say that "He rides on a horse" is incorrect, but that it's not natural.

    Just like you might say "I saw him driving a convertible" instead of "I saw him driving in a convertible." It's not wrong, but it's just not often said.

    [business writer, not teacher]

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: to ride (on a) horse

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Is it correct when I say e.g. "He rides on a horse." or "He's riding to the forest on his horse."? I guess the first example is incorrect, isn't it?
    No - it's fine. 'He rides on a horse' is OK. We usually drop the 'on' when specifying the sort of horse: 'He rides a black stallion' [specifying a habit] but the 'on' could be included there (especially if the verb's present continuous) - 'He usually rides a black stallion, but he's riding on a chestnut mare today'. [But don't take my word for it; other teachers may 'hear' this differently.]

    If you mention the destination, you could omit the 'horse' altogether: 'He's riding to the forest' (you'd specify 'on a horse' if there was a range of possible mounts - 'on a horse' rather than 'on a mule/donkey/bicycle...).

    b


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: to ride (on a) horse

    I would say that "He rides a horse" and certainly would not add "on" if saying someone is riding a different animal from usual. "Normally he rides a black stallion; today he is riding a chestnut mare".

    "On a horse" is somewhat tautologous as "riding" implies being on the animal.

  4. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #5

    Re: to ride (on a) horse

    OK, thank you for your replies! :)

Similar Threads

  1. ride and ride on
    By daisy1352 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-May-2007, 12:10
  2. Beating a Dead Horse? -- Origin
    By Scint in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Jul-2006, 01:18
  3. It's like a horse
    By MiaL in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2006, 23:06
  4. a ride
    By Unregistered Lina in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Nov-2004, 04:14
  5. Ride by, ride past and stop by
    By nicolas in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 22-Jan-2004, 12:41

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •