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    #1

    "Before" vs "in front of"

    What are the differences between "before" and "in front of" an object?
    Are there any cases where their meanings are overlapped?
    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: "Before" vs "in front of"

    When you're dealing with two dimensions, the meaning can overlap- a word could come before/in front of another.


    • Join Date: Aug 2007
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    #3

    Re: "Before" vs "in front of"

    Typical mistake: I think Iíll put the desk before the window.


    In modern English, before is not very often used as preposition of place; we use in front of instead.

    I think Iíll put the desk in front of the window.
    Thereís a car parked right in front of our gate, and I canít get out!

    Before is used to refer to place in a few cases:

    1. talking about the order in which things come (in lists, etc)

    Your name comes before mine.

    2. to mean Ď in the presence of (somebody important )í

    I came up before the magistrates for dangerous driving last week.

    3. in the expressions right before my eyes, before my very eyes.


    ----Michael Swan, Practical English Usage

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    #4

    Re: "Before" vs "in front of"

    Quote Originally Posted by hdrao View Post
    Typical mistake: I think Iíll put the desk before the window.


    In modern English, before is not very often used as preposition of place; we use in front of instead.

    I think Iíll put the desk in front of the window.
    Thereís a car parked right in front of our gate, and I canít get out!

    Before is used to refer to place in a few cases:

    1. talking about the order in which things come (in lists, etc)

    Your name comes before mine.

    2. to mean Ď in the presence of (somebody important )í

    I came up before the magistrates for dangerous driving last week.

    3. in the expressions right before my eyes, before my very eyes.


    ----Michael Swan, Practical English Usage
    Sound & Clear, Thank you.

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