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    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #1

    And?

    Harry hardly pays his bill on time, and his sister does too.

    What is the matter with this sentence? Can you explain it to me?
    Last edited by belly_ttt; 31-Aug-2007 at 16:50.


    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 39
    #2

    Re: And?

    I think it would be better to put it this way:

    Harry and his sister hardly ever (rarely) pay their bills on time.


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #3

    Re: And?

    They direct the right place is "Does too", I don't know why


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: And?

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    They direct the right place is "Does too", I don't know why
    Can you explain this? What do you mean "They direct the right place is...."?


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #5

    Re: And?

    It means, they pointed out the wrong thing of the sentence is "does too" which is at the end of the sentence

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    #6

    Re: And?

    The problem is that the sentence is really saying that Harry doesn't pay his bills on time. It should be:

    Harry hardly pays his bill on time, and his sister doesn't either.

    Better yet:

    Harry hardly pays his bill on time, and nieither does his sister.

    Because hardly usually (as in your example) has a negative connotation, it should be treated like a negative in a sentence. If you put a more obviously negative word in the sentence in place of hardly, this becomes more clear.

    Harry never pays his bill on time, and his sister doesn't either.


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #7

    Re: And?

    Thanks


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #8

    Re: And?

    But, how about this sentence:

    You can have an orange, and you can't have an apple, too

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #9

    Re: And?

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    But, how about this sentence:

    You can have an orange, and you can't have an apple, too
    Too is synonymous with also in that context. In other words,
    Ex: You can have an orange, but you can't have both ~ you can't also have an apple.
    It's not Standard English, but it's English nontheless.


    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 39
    #10

    Re: And?

    Say:

    You can have an orange, but you can't have an apple.

    Do you have an equivalent of too in Vietnamese?

    If yes, Is it used the same way as in English?

    Linguistic interferences are sources of problems for language learners.

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