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    #1

    Cool Still quite

    Hello,

    What does this sentence mean " Still quite to finish"?


    Thank You


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 16
    #2

    Re: Still quite

    I would say that it is missing 'a lot'. If this is the case, then in Britain it could mean that there is a lot still to be done. We Brits often use quite to mean something similar to 'very' or 'a lot'.

    Example:

    How was your weekend?

    It was quite good (meaning I had a lovely weekend).

    Perhaps this is due to our apparantly reserved nature. However, quite can mean quite. It is an issue of pragmatics, what is conveyed above and beyond the literal meaning of the word(s) expressed.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #3

    Re: Still quite

    In addition,
    Ex: There's still quite a bit to finish.

  2. #4

    Re: Still quite

    [CAUTION: I am not a teacher:take the advice and or corrections offered in this post at your own risk.
    If you doubt the information, please get a qualified opinion from one of the teachers on these forums.]

    Just a technical note, -kahhong- what you have presented is not a sentence, or a fragment, it's missing an object. Could you perhaps put the sentence as you have written it into context?

    Or perhaps you meant it in the sense of "Still quite...to finish"?

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    #5

    Cool Re: Still quite

    Ok. Thank You.

    "John is doing his homework. He is still quite more to finish."
    it mean, John is still have a lot of homework that have not been done. Am i correct?

  3. #6

    Re: Still quite

    [CAUTION: I am not a teacher:take the advice and or corrections offered in this post at your own risk.
    If you doubt the information, please get a qualified opinion from one of the teachers on these forums.]

    Ah-ha. Yes, as suspected, there are some problems with the structure. Let's try to break it down.

    "He has homework to finish."

    "He has a lot of homework to finish."

    "He has quite a lot of homework to finish."

    "He still has quite a lot of homework to finish."

    --------------------------------------------
    --------------------------------------------
    A:"Is he doing his homework?"

    B:"Yes, but he still has quite a lot [of homework] to finish."


    This reconstruction may also help you to see the structure in a different way.

    He has a lot.

    He has quite a lot.

    He still has quite a lot.

    He still has quite a lot to finish
    (n.b.: the operative verb is "to have", not "to be", and whatever has to be finished should have been mentioned or be understood before it can be omitted)

    He still has quite a lot of things.
    He still has quite a lot to do.

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