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    #1

    is and has

    Hello, Are they the same?

    1. Chris is working hard since monday.
    2. Chris has been working hard since monday.


    Thank You

  1. #2

    Re: is and has

    [CAUTION: I am not a teacher:take the advice and or corrections offered in this post at your own risk.
    If you doubt the information, please get a qualified opinion from one of the teachers on these forums.]

    is doing and has done

    You cannot say "is doing since", when it is followed by a specific time, or general time for that matter. You can follow "since" with an event, and even then I'm not even sure as a native speaker whether "since" is being used to explain a reason or show the passage of time.

    "He is working much harder since he got a raise."
    (this could mean "because he got a raise", but then I think it would be said:"He is working much harder, since he got a raise.)

    but

    "He is playing piano since his childhood.(x)

    To clear up any confusion: in your example, always say: "has been (doing)+since"

    Any other suggestions on this one?
    Last edited by weiming; 03-Sep-2007 at 06:40.

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    #3

    Question Re: is and has

    ok. thank You.

    one of the present continuous usage is to talk about things happening in a period around now.
    Eg: You are working hard today.

    In other hand, one of the present perfect continuous usage is the activity is still continue.
    Eg: It has been raining for 2 hours/ since morning.

    is the usage similar for both Present Perfect continuous and present continuous in this case?

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    #4

    Cool Re: is and has

    i could not differentiate these two usage. :P

  2. #5

    Re: is and has

    [CAUTION: I am not a teacher:take the advice and or corrections offered in this post at your own risk.
    If you doubt the information, please get a qualified opinion from one of the teachers on these forums]

    I'm not fully sure I understand your question. I would divide the present continuous into two distinct classes:

    One that is actually occurring at the moment of speech:

    He is watching t.v.. (now)

    And one that talks aout a continuous action that is still current at the time of speech.

    I am studying at school. (and have been, but not at the exact moment I am speaking)

    Sructurally, they are identical, but when I speak, the thoughts are formed as completely different ideas and to me (and my hearers) their meaning is different, but comes mainly from the circumstances of the conversation and probability this sounds confusing but it's quite simple.

    A:Hey, what have you been up to this week?
    B:I'm preparing for exams.

    (actually, I'm saying I have been preparing for exams, the have been is unnecessary and so omitted)

    A:Do you know what your brother is going to be for Halloween?
    B:I'm making his costume.

    (if they are having a face to face conversation, it is obvious that she is not making it at that moment, if they are on the phone it becomes ambiguous, but "B" would clarify by saying something like "at this very moment")

    This post has some related information
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/f...ve-having.html

    page 1, longish post at the bottom.

    The point of the present continuous is to stress that an action is taking place currently, and continues to do so.

    The present perfect continuous puts more emphasis on the fact that the action has already started, in the past, and continued to the present where it still goes on, and often has a comment about how long it has been going on, lest it be confused with another form.

    This tradition has been handed down for centuries.

    I have been waiting for days.

    He has been fishing (for an hour).

    and not

    He has been fishing (before).

    Hope that, and the other post (I suggest you read it), help.
    Last edited by weiming; 03-Sep-2007 at 09:25.

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    #6

    Question Re: is and has

    What are the differences between these two sentences?

    1. Is Susan working this week?
    2. Has Susan Worked this week?

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