Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Grablevskij's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 217
    #1

    At the end of a sentence

    Most of my textbooks usually say: at the end of a sentence.

    For example:
    1) 'each' at the end of a sentence.
    These oranges cost 25 pence each.

    2) myself/yourself etc.
    You can do it yourself.

    3) a preposition:
    Do you know the Tom is talking to?

    And so forth.

    What is the end of a sentence: before the adverbial modifiers or in the very end of the sentence, or both the ways are correct?

    Michael

  2. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,969
    #2

    Wink Re: At the end of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Grablevskij View Post
    Most of my textbooks usually say: at the end of a sentence.

    For example:
    1) 'each' at the end of a sentence.
    These oranges cost 25 pence each.

    2) myself/yourself etc.
    You can do it yourself.

    3) a preposition:
    Do you know the Tom is talking to?

    And so forth.

    What is the end of a sentence: before the adverbial modifiers or in the very end of the sentence, or both the ways are correct?

    Michael
    Sometimes it's the very end of a sentence, like it is in your first sentence with each. Sometimes, however, it is not exactly the end of a sentence:
    Do you know who Tom is talking to? is fine, but if you wanted to put an adverbial, like now, it's the adverbial, and not the preposition to, that would go at the end of a sentence:
    Do you know who Tom is talking to now?
    Do you know who Tom is talking to so loudly?
    and other similar ones...

  3. Grablevskij's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 217
    #3

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    Really?

    These oranges cost 25 pence yesterday each.

    Sounds clumsy to me.

    Michael

  4. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,969
    #4

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Grablevskij View Post
    Really?

    These oranges cost 25 pence yesterday each.

    Sounds clumsy to me.

    Michael
    Oh sorry Michael, you got me wrong.
    As it is with a preposition at the end of a sentence, the same goes for each (and surely many others) as well; luckily, you yourself were able to notice that the sentence, These oranges cost 25 pence yesterday each, sounds really clumsy. It reads absolutely better like this:
    These oranges cost 25 pence each yesterday.
    It's all about what you want to end your sentence with, and how it works with other parts of the sentence. Sometimes it's just about the flow of a sentence.

  5. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #5

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Grablevskij View Post
    What is the end of a sentence: before the adverbial modifiers or in the very end of the sentence, or both the ways are correct?
    The very last word marks the end of the sentence:

    These oranges cost 25 pense each.
    These oranges cost 25 pense each yesterday.
    These oranges cost 25 pense each yesterday, but only 20 pense today.

    You can do it yourself.
    You can do it yourself too.
    You can do it yourself too; I did. <two sentences>

    Do you know who Tom is talking to?
    Do you know who Tom is talking to now?
    Do you know who Tom is talking to now on the phone?

  6. Grablevskij's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 217
    #6

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    What about the second example here?

    What will it be like with tomorrow for instance?

    Michael

  7. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #7

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Grablevskij View Post
    What about the second example here?

    What will it be like with tomorrow for instance?
    Michael, the last word ends the sentence:

    2) You can do it yourself tomorrow. <last word>

  8. Grablevskij's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 217
    #8

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    Thank you.

    Michael

  9. Grablevskij's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 217
    #9

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    Could anybody speculate on the position of the adverbial of place in this sentence:

    Sue has a lot of friends, many of whom she was at school with.

    I can place 'at school' before 'with', can't I?

    Michael

  10. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #10

    Re: At the end of a sentence

    Two positions:

    1. ...many of whom she was with at school.
    2. ...many of whom she was at school with.

    ________
    Note, a few, but not all, who subscribe to the traditional rules of grammar might find 2. awkward (but not ungrammatical) because it ends in a preposition.

Similar Threads

  1. sentence structure question
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Jan-2008, 10:53
  2. the whole sentence used as a noun
    By hamoodee in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-Oct-2006, 16:55
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2006, 14:07
  4. Attributive Clause - China Needs Your Help
    By ChinaDavid in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-Jan-2005, 16:56
  5. grammar
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2003, 20:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •