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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile beak/bill

    The hen used her beak/bill to pick up the corn off the ground.


    Are "beak" and "bill" the same thing? Which fits here better, beak or bill?
    Second, could I use 'from" to replace "off" without changing its meaning?
    Thanks.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: beak/bill

    Whether a bird has a beak or a bill depends upon its feeding habits. Birds that need to peck at the ground or at trees in order to find grain, fruit and insects have a hard, pointy beak. Birds such as waterfowl (ducks, geese) that catch small fish and other aquatic creatures have a longer, flatter bill (as opposed to a beak).

    A chicken has a beak; in your sentence, "off of the ground" is fine, or you can say "from the ground."

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: beak/bill

    Thanks, Ouisch, for the crystal clear answer.

    No time no see! How is everything with you?

    Kind regards,


    Lewis

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