Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Spetsnaz26's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 80
    #1

    usage of Senior,Junior,freshman,etc...

    How are these words, when describing a college student, used in a setence? Are they used alone, like "I'm a senior", or can I elaborate by saying "I'm a senior student"?

    And another question, is there any word in English to describe postgraduate students?

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: usage of Senior,Junior,freshman,etc...

    This is not an answer; the question seems to be about Am E. Just another word to add to the list of things that need explaining: sophomore (and sophomoric).

    b

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #3

    Re: usage of Senior,Junior,freshman,etc...

    We would either say "I'm a freshman" or "I'm in my freshman year." We would not add "student." However, when describing someone doing postgraduate studies, we would say "I'm a graduate student at Harvard Law."

    Further info (from my favorite magazine, Mental Floss):
    There was a time when almost every university student was a sophomore. Well, a sophister, to be exact, but that’s where the word “sophomore” originated. A sophist was a wise man (derived from the Greek word sophos), so when Henry VIII endowed the “new” Cambridge University in the 16th century, it was decided to use that term to describe the students. A first year student was simply a fresh-man, which was a term applied to a novice in virtually any field at that time. Second year students were “junior sophists,” and third year were “senior sophists.” (Cambridge was a three-year university at the time.)

    The founder of Harvard University in the U.S. was a graduate of Cambridge, so he brought the terminology with him. When four years became the standard to obtain a degree, the second year was dubbed sophumer, a variation of sophist. Other universities started using the designations as well, and eventually “sophumer” became “sophomore,” and “sophist” was dropped from the junior and senior years. The terms weren’t applied to high school students until the early 20th century, which brings us to the current time, when some politically correct mavens object to the “man” in “freshman.” To them we say, call yourself whatever you want, just don’t get caught alone in the locker room when there’s an upperclassman nearby…

  4. Spetsnaz26's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 80
    #4

    Re: usage of Senior,Junior,freshman,etc...

    Well...Very comprehensive answer, thank you Ouisch.

  5. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: usage of Senior,Junior,freshman,etc...

    Thanks Ouisch . At Cambridge, in the pre-PC days of the '70s, the Freshman question didn't affect us, as everyone in their first year was a "fresher" (although the term was chiefly used at the beginning of the first term, especially during Freshers' Week [when all the societies gave away freebies and tried to get you to take out a life subscription]).

    I'm still confused about 'sophomoric'. Does that have to do with the high-school use of 'sophomore', or are 2nd-year university students that way inclined?

    b

Similar Threads

  1. Usage of is been--- posted by ankurkalohia
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Jul-2007, 18:21
  2. Re: Usage of certain very common words
    By Dinesh Boudh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2007, 21:23
  3. let me ask you about the article usage
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2006, 11:24
  4. Equivalent words and usage of BE "bloody" in AE?
    By amigo in forum English Slang
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Jun-2005, 10:00

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •