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    • Join Date: Jul 2005
    • Posts: 928
    #1

    futile

    Hi,

    could you please tell me whether it is possible to say:

    After futile lapse of the above-mentioned period, the client is entitled to withdraw from the contract.

    "Futile" should mean that the other party did not make use of the period granted and did not meet the requirements.

    Thanks a lot!

    Hanka


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: futile

    No - incorrect use. "futile" = having no effect, pointless [action]

    In this sentence it would be better to say "If the client fails to implement this agreement within the period specified above, then the contract will become null and void."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: futile

    futile = trifling , frivolous, unimportant
    entitle = empower, (have right), to furnish with a right or claim to some thing
    lapse = an accidental or temporary decline or deviation from an expected or accepted condition or state, a slip or error, often of a trivial sort, failure

    Regardless (in spite) of the trifling lapse (failure), the client have right to withdraw from the contract unpunished. (He is not obliged to pay a penalty for breaking that precise contract)


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: futile

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Regardless (in spite) of the trifling lapse (failure), the client have right to withdraw from the contract unpunished. (He is not obliged to pay a penalty for breaking that precise contract)
    I am afraid this is not good legal English and would not be accepted by a legal department.

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