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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Concrete or abstract

    Is the word "gang" a concrete or abstract noun?

  2. atm's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    'Gang' is a collective noun, e.g:

    a gang of workmen.

    Collective nouns are singular but they refer to a group of animate beings.

    Hope this helps.

    atm


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    #3

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Is the word "gang" a concrete or abstract noun?
    Gang is a concrete noun. I could physically show you a gang. It is not something that exists only in one's mind.

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    What about, say, a gang of ghosts and a gang of ideas?


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    #5

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    What about, say, a gang of ghosts and a gang of ideas?
    Don't confuse them with non-standard usage of the word gang

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    Don't confuse them with non-standard usage of the word gang
    OK. Fair enough, but what about concrete nouns that are used abstractly? (Just because you can, e.g., touch something, doesn't make it a concrete noun grammatically. )


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    #7

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    OK. Fair enough, but what about concrete nouns that are used abstractly? (Just because you can, e.g., touch something, doesn't make it a concrete noun grammatically. )
    Hmmmm.... well my understanding of a concrete noun is one that appeals to the five senses of sight, sound, smell, taste or touch.

    So...if a normally concrete noun is used in an abstract way...then I suppose it would then be perceived as an abstract noun in that case.
    Last edited by Naamplao; 26-Sep-2007 at 20:34.

  5. atm's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    So a concrete noun can be a collective noun too?

    By the way, my initial answer to this thread was taken, almost verbatim, from 'Grammar Made Easy' by Gordon Kaye.

    Yep, 'Made Easy'. Hahahah!

    You have to laugh at the absurdity of English grammar. Tdol, what do you think?

    atm
    Last edited by atm; 30-Sep-2007 at 05:54. Reason: Editing reasons

  6. Soup's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Concrete or abstract

    Quote Originally Posted by atm View Post
    So a concrete noun can be a collective noun too?
    The other way around. A collective noun can be concrete; e.g., put the pack (of cigarettes) on the table, but the distinction concrete v. abstract doesn't define that category of nouns. That is, whether a collective noun is concrete or abstract isn't an issue. It's whether a collective noun agrees in number with its verb that's important.

    ________________
    Note on why nouns are categorized.

    Semantics (meaning)
    All nouns fall into one of these three categories:
    Concrete: if you can't touch it, it's not concrete.
    Abstract: if you can touch it, then it's not abstract.
    Collective: make sure it agrees in number with its verb.
    Punctuation
    All nouns are either proper or common:
    Proper: capitalize it.
    Common: don't capitalize it.
    Grammar (morphology)
    All nouns are either count or non-count:
    Count: add -s
    Non-count: don't add -s

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