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    • Join Date: Jul 2007
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    #1

    help?

    Does this sentence make sense?

    I havn't been there for in three years?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: help?

    No, use either "for" or "in," but not both.

    [not a teacher]


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
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    #3

    Re: help?

    what does it mean when i say:

    i haven't been there in 3 yrs.?

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: help?

    Within (inside of) the past 3 years, I haven't been there.


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
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    #5

    Re: help?

    SoupRe: help?
    Within (inside of) the past 3 years, I haven't been there.

    so, do it mean axactly same as i haven't been there for 3 yrs.?

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: help?

    For practical purposes, yes.

    I haven't been there for three years could carry the meaning of "the length of time that I have been there is not three years."

    As in, I haven't been [living] in Canada for three years - it's only been two years.

    Obviously, context would let you know if that was even a possible meaning. If you're not living there at all, then obviously you haven't been there three years (or two or four).


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
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    #7

    Re: help?

    Re: help?
    For practical purposes, yes.

    I haven't been there for three years could carry the meaning of "the length of time that I have been there is not three years."

    As in, I haven't been [living] in Canada for three years - it's only been two years.

    Obviously, context would let you know if that was even a possible meaning. If you're not living there at all, then obviously you haven't been there three years (or two or four).
    what if it is in present perfect. i mean if we treat the be word as a main instead of an auxilary verb, does it still carry that meaning of the length of time that i have been there is not three years yet?
    By the way, can i reverse even and a for the bold sentence that i quote from yours? it'll become: a even possible meaning.
    thank you. and please correct me if i made any grammar mistakes.

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