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    #1

    decorative dollop

    This delicious looking cream soup is a combination of cream of carrot and cream of asparagus. There is a decorative dollop of sour cream in the middle.

    Do you agree with using of this "puzzling for me" word "dollop"?. It would be simpler to take advantage of the more comprehensible words as "application", "ornament", dressing". Dollop (dolap) in my native language is a ordinary "cupboard". Does someone need this
    elaborateness in general?


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
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    #2

    Re: decorative dollop

    A "dollop" is something specific---a small mound of a semi-solid substance, e.g. whipped cream, dropped from the end of a spoon. I don't believe I've ever heard this word used in a non-food context. The word instantly conveys its meaning to an English-speaking cook. "Dressing," in fact, means something completely different--a "dressing" of sour cream applied to a salad would mean that the sour cream was diffused throughout the dish.

    [not a teacher]

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    #3

    Re: decorative dollop

    Thank you, Delmobile, for your explanation about the main point of the term "dollop" and it's application in the sphere of the "cooking".

    dollop = a lump or glob of something soft or mushy (top it with a dollop of jam)

    dollop = an amount given, spooned, or ladled out (want just a dollop of ketchup)

    I have found a something different application.

    dollop = an indefinite often large quantity especially of something liquid; (out of heaven, as if a plug had been pulled, fell a jolly dollop of rain)

    or

    Once every two weeks he gives me a dose of guilt, mixed in with a big dollop of sympathy and a while plateful of sadness to choke me on my Sunday dinner.

    I, as a non literate English speaker am in sympathy with this. What do you think of it? Please answer me as "no teacher"!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: decorative dollop

    Delmobile is correct in saying that it is primarily used in a food connection, but it is a good and useful word to express a lump of something. A dollop of sympathy, A dollop of muck, a dollop of snow - all are lively and expressive uses.

    Its etymology is interesting: 1573, from E. Anglian dial. dallop "patch, tuft or clump of grass," of uncertain origin. Modern sense of "a lump or glob" is 1812

    I love "a glob of something"

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    #5

    Re: decorative dollop

    Anglika, I saw your point. Really and truly the English language is very luxuriant and picturesque.

    Anglika, thank you for you go shares with us so willingly your working knowledge.

    Could you tell me when will I cease to make so many errors in my writing?


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    #6

    Re: decorative dollop

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Anglika, I saw your point. Really and truly the English language is very luxuriant and picturesque.

    Anglika, thank you for sharing with us so willingly your working knowledge.

    Could you tell me when will I cease to make so many errors in my writing?
    What errors?

    You write good English, generally, and as you are aware practice makes perfect. Even the best English writers have been known to make errors.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: decorative dollop

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    ...

    Its etymology is interesting: 1573, from E. Anglian dial. dallop "patch, tuft or clump of grass," of uncertain origin. Modern sense of "a lump or glob" is 1812

    ...
    That is interesting. The dairy marketing board of Devon [which non-native speakers may not know is several hundred miles from E. Anglia] used this word in an advertising slogan for clotted cream: 'Give 'em a gurt [standard English 'great'] big dollop.'

    b

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    #8

    Re: decorative dollop

    Dear BobK, you should know that the most of the non-native English speakers are not aboriginal natives in such way as you think.

    Do I know something about Devon? My country got a member of EU recently, but we have to be acquainted with our neighbors. I know something about Sir. Francis Drake for example and something about Devon as farming and pastoral county (for beef and dairy cattle). I know the Devonshire tea, including jam and clotted cream, which was, is and I hope will be the local specialty. In defiance of the fact that nowadays we use pampers diapers (for children, not for us) I know something about baby nappy and it,s cream like contest. And because I know that "gurt" in standard English is equal to "big*great" it is clear that I have understood your idiom without embarrassment.

    big dollop = a big dollop, as in cow plop or the contests of a baby nappy.

    Thank you, so I might find out many very interesting for me words.
    Last edited by vil; 28-Sep-2007 at 19:52.

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    #9

    Re: decorative dollop

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear BobK, you should know that the most of the non-native English speakers are not aboriginal natives in such way as you think.

    Do I know something about Devon? My country got a member of EU recently, but we have to be acquainted with our neighbors. I know something about Sir. Francis Drake for example and something about Devon as farming and pastoral county (for beef and dairy cattle). I know the Devonshire tea, including jam and clotted cream, which was, is and I hope will be the local specialty. In defiance of the fact that nowadays we use pampers diapers (for children, not for us) I know something about baby nappy and it,s cream like contest. And because I know that "gurt" in standard English is equal to "big*great" it is clear that I have understood your idiom without embarrassment.

    big dollop = a big dollop, as in cow plop or the contests of a baby nappy.

    Thank you, so I might find out many very interesting for me words.
    You should then know that any Gentleman from Tongue to Devon would not be uncoughly assertive. Bob said that non -natives may not know.That does not imply you don't know. There is also an English way to doll up words.

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    #10

    Re: decorative dollop

    Dear Chomat, likes a genuine French man, you showed us, that you have at one's fingers the ends of th luxuriant English language as well as your grandfather " maybe an venerable musketeer" - the rapier. Really I wouldn't want to measure swords with you.
    I appreciate your educational explication Bob's words. Thank you for using so interesting words. Really, it is never too late to learn. So as, to improve(doll up) oneself (here I have in mind my humble person).

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 29-Sep-2007 at 17:53.

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