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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Talking Nuance question

    What is the difference between these two sentences?
    1. I like to swim.
    2. I like swimming.


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    #2

    Re: Nuance question

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    What is the difference between these two sentences?
    1. I like to swim.
    2. I like swimming.
    there is no difference in meaning.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Nuance question

    Unless, that is, you use them like this:

    I like to swim on Sundays. (a particular occasion)
    I like swimming. (a general activity)


    Click here, see post #6.


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    #4

    Re: Nuance question

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Unless, that is, you use them like this:

    I like to swim on Sundays. (a particular occasion)
    I like swimming. (a general activity)


    Click here, see post #6.
    I like to swim on Sundays.
    I like swimming on Sundays.

    I'd say these still mean the same

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Nuance question

    Not really, but it's your language too.

    Tom[e]to, tom[a]to.


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    #6

    Re: Nuance question

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Not really, but it's your language too.

    Tom[e]to, tom[a]to.
    Explain the difference as you see it then....

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    #7

    Re: Nuance question

    In British English, there can be this distinction; we can use the infinitive to emphasise that we are fond of something under certain circumstances.

    I like swimming.
    I like to swim when I am on holiday. (We could use the gerund here too, but the infinitive suggests to me that outside these circumstances, I don't really like swimming.)


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    #8

    Re: Nuance question

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    In British English, there can be this distinction; we can use the infinitive to emphasise that we are fond of something under certain circumstances.

    I like swimming.
    I like to swim when I am on holiday. (We could use the gerund here too, but the infinitive suggests to me that outside these circumstances, I don't really like swimming.)
    I like swimming when I am on holiday.
    I like to swim when I am on holiday.

    I think you are splitting a pretty fine hair trying to think of a difference

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Nuance question

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    I like swimming when I am on holiday.
    I like to swim when I am on holiday.

    I think you are splitting a pretty fine hair trying to think of a difference
    The semantic distinction manifest in to-infinitive v. -ing is a matter of actualization. Verbs lacking tense properties, i.e., infinitives, are not completely actualized, whereas verbs having tense properties, i.e., participles and gerunds, are actualized: The speaker has some experience or knowledge of the act itself. For example,

    I like to swim on holiday, but I never get the chance.
    I like swimming on holiday. (I've done it before)

    Speakers who use to-infinitive and -ing forms interchangeably do so because the contexts in which those forms occur are usually altered by ellipsis, which makes the two forms appear synonymous, and the reason speakers today are starting to merge the two.

    ___________
    Food for thought: recently, it has been proposed that swimming in I like swimming is a participle, not a gerund. Do you agree or disagree, and why?


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    #10

    Re: Nuance question

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    The semantic distinction manifest in to-infinitive v. -ing is a matter of actualization. Verbs lacking tense properties, i.e., infinitives, are not completely actualized, whereas verbs having tense properties, i.e., participles and gerunds, are actualized: The speaker has some experience or knowledge of the act itself. For example,

    I like to swim on holiday, but I never get the chance.
    I like swimming on holiday. (I've done it before)

    Speakers who use to-infinitive and -ing forms interchangeably do so because the contexts in which those forms occur are usually altered by ellipsis, which makes the two forms appear synonymous, and the reason speakers today are starting to merge the two.

    ___________
    Food for thought: recently, it has been proposed that swimming in I like swimming is a participle, not a gerund. Do you agree or disagree, and why?
    I find it curious that when you compare the infinitive to the gerund usage you never use the same sentence form.

    I like to swim on holiday, but I never get the chance.
    I like swimming on holiday, but I never get the chance.

    This means the same thing, I submit.... compare apples to apples...not apples to oranges.

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